Wounded narcissism that actuated a mass-homicide-suicide

Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 22.25.37Der Amok-Pilot

Wounded narcissism is Dalrymple’s hypothesis, though ‘information still to come may refute it’. The tragedy, he writes,

lays bare the preposterous contention that psychological disturbance, known metaphorically as illness, is precisely the same nature as physical illness, a contention now enshrined in the laws of several countries. This has always been dishonest, as witnessed by the public outrage that Lubitz was allowed to fly despite a history of medicated misery.

Did Lufthansa know that its employee had such a history?

If it did, it suggests that it was more afraid of an accusation of discrimination against the mentally disturbed than of a crash of an aircraft.

'Much has been written concerning the acts of homicidal mania called amok, which word in the vernacular means to attack. It was formerly believed that these outbursts were to be attributed to madness pur et simple, and some cases of amok can certainly be traced to this source. These are not, however, in any sense typical, and might equally have been perpetrated by men of another race. The typical amok is usually the result of circumstances which render a Malay desperate. The motive is often inadequate from the point of view of a European, but to the Malay it is sufficient to make him weary of life and anxious to court death. Briefly, where a man of another race might not improbably commit suicide, a Malay runs amok, killing all whom he may meet until he himself is slain.’ — Sir Hugh Clifford, extract from entry on ‘Malays' in Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Ed. (1910). Clifford spent two decades in Perak; he was British Resident in Pahang (1896-1900 and 1901-03) and held many other posts.

‘Much has been written concerning the acts of homicidal mania called amok, which word in the vernacular means to attack. It was formerly believed that these outbursts were to be attributed to madness pur et simple, and some cases of amok can certainly be traced to this source. These are not, however, in any sense typical, and might equally have been perpetrated by men of another race. The typical amok is usually the result of circumstances which render a Malay desperate. The motive is often inadequate from the point of view of a European, but to the Malay it is sufficient to make him weary of life and anxious to court death. Briefly, where a man of another race might not improbably commit suicide, a Malay runs amok, killing all whom he may meet until he himself is slain.’ — Sir Hugh Clifford, extract from entry on ‘Malays’ in Encyclopædia Britannica, 11th Ed. (1910). Clifford spent two decades in Perak; he was British Resident in Pahang (1896-1900 and 1901-03) and held many other posts.

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