Postcards from Southsea

Screen Shot 2016-06-21 at 08.54.08Once a haven

of petty-bourgeois respectability, it is now seedy, its Victorian and Edwardian terraces divided into flats and bedsits for students, recipients of social security, and transients. I loved it.

There are

Conan Doyle's home and consulting-room

Conan Doyle’s home and consulting-room

scores of little shops, with no chain shops in sight; and you could park for free for two hours.

Opposite the United Reformed Church (1911; converted into seedy flats), Dalrymple (probably without his wife, also a doctor, who takes the view that there may be enough books in the Maison Dalrymple already) visits Adelphi Books. Specialising in pre-war crime novels, it is

presided over by a pre-internet owner who did not spend his time poring over a computer comparing prices.

Southsea

seemed delightfully unregulated; it was like going back several decades.

Excellent and cheap

Excellent and cheap

Dr and Dr Dalrymple meet up again and go to

an excellent and cheap Japanese restaurant – £17 [$25] for two with a beer included. The manager apologised for the slight delay in the arrival of the food (it was very slight). ‘We’re suddenly very busy,’ he said. ‘I expect it’s the rain. When the weather’s good, people have better things to do than come here.

Dalrymple’s reaction to this remark:

I think I could be happy in Southsea.

Screen Shot 2016-06-20 at 23.51.15

The proprietor at Adelphi does not waste his time poring over a computer comparing prices


Where Conan Doyle was a general practitioner

Where Conan Doyle was a general practitioner

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