A really good man

screen-shot-2017-02-12-at-16-49-13Dalrymple draws attention to the opening of Sir Henry H. Bashford’s Augustus Carp, Esq., By Himself, Being the Autobiography of a Really Good Man (1924):

It is customary, I have noticed, in publishing an autobiography to preface it with some sort of apology. But there are times, and surely the present is one of them, when to do so is manifestly unnecessary. In an age when every standard of decent conduct has either been torn down or is threatened with destruction; when every newspaper is daily reporting scenes of violence, divorce, and arson; when quite young girls smoke cigarettes and even, I am assured, sometimes cigars; when mature women, the mothers of unhappy children, enter the sea in one-piece bathing-costumes; and when married men, the heads of households, prefer the flicker of the cinematograph to the Athanasian Creed — then it is obviously a task, not to be justifiably avoided, to place some higher example before the world.

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Bashford was the king’s physician

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With unction and humility Augustus describes his virtuous youth and manhood and his efforts to rid society of strong drink and tobacco, dancing, the theatre, and other manifestations of man’s lower nature; not omitting his surrender to the wiles of an actress or what ensued when she plied him with intoxicants disguised as fruit juice.

With unction and humility Augustus describes his virtuous youth and manhood and his efforts to rid society of strong drink and tobacco, dancing, the theatre, and other manifestations of man’s lower nature; not omitting his surrender to the wiles of an actress or what ensued when she plied him with intoxicants disguised as fruit juice.

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