Censorship makes necessary the implicit

Pushkin statue, St Petersburg

Dalrymple ventures to point out that

the great majority of great art was produced under conditions of censorship.

The removal of all censorship

has not resulted in a florescence of the arts, and certainly not in literature, quite the reverse.

He notes that

the golden age of Russian literature was certainly not one of an absence of censorship, nor was Shakespeare entirely free to write what he might have liked.

Censorship

makes necessary the implicit, which is always more powerful and moving than the explicit.

If we were obliged to disregard that part of the artistic heritage of Man that was produced under conditions of censorship,

there would be practically nothing left. And if, conversely, we were obliged to regard only that part of the heritage that was produced under conditions of complete freedom of expression, we should have but little artistic sustenance from the past.

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