Category Archives: antinomianism

Uncouth chic

Screen Shot 2016-05-01 at 13.53.48Professional soccer players, Dalrymple points out, are drawn

from the class adjacent to the underclass, into which downward slippage is all too easy.

But in the past,

those who managed to escape their lowly origins usually aspired to be taken for bona fide members of the middle classes by conforming their conduct to middle-class standards.

No longer. Newfound wealth imposes no obligation to change one’s ways. Violent and despicable public conduct results

neither in legal sanction, social ostracism, nor even strong disapproval.

In England,

the direction of cultural aspiration has reversed: it is the middle classes that aspire to be taken for their social inferiors, an aspiration that (in their opinion) necessitates misconduct.

Young middle-class women proudly sport tattoos, for example,

as badges of antinomian defiance, of intellectual independence, and of identification with the supposedly downtrodden—if not of the entire world, then at least of our inner cities.

Advertising

glamorises the underclass way of life and its attitude towards the world. A new style has been invented.

Triumph of the antinomians

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 12.05.15Dalrymple writes in the preface to Our Culture, What’s Left of It: The Mandarins and the Masses that in much of the world, the miseries of poverty

are no longer those of raw physical deprivation but those induced by comparison with the vast numbers of prosperous people by whom the relatively poor are surrounded and whose comparative wealth the poor feel as a wound, a reproach, and an injustice.

Ronnie Kaufman's photo on a jacket by Jen Huppert Design

Photo by Ronnie Kaufman on a jacket by Jen Huppert Design for the Ivan R. Dee (Chicago) 2005 edition

In the 20th century,

the hope of progress has not proved altogether illusory,

but

neither has the fear of retrogression proved unjustified.

The First World War

destroyed facile optimism that progress towards heaven on earth was inevitable or even possible.

Then came communism and Nazism, which between them

destroyed scores of millions of lives in a fashion that only a few short decades before would have appeared inconceivable.

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 12.47.50Many of the disasters of the 20th century

could be characterised as revolts against civilisation itself: the Cultural Revolution, or the Khmers Rouges.

Only recently, in Rwanda,

ordinary people were transformed into pitiless murderers by demagogic appeals over the radio. They achieved a rate of slaughter with their machetes never equalled even by the Nazis.

In the circumstances,

one might have supposed that a principal preoccupation of intellectuals would be the maintenance of the boundaries that separate civilisation from barbarism.

One would be wrong.

Some have embraced barbarism; others have remained unaware that boundaries do not maintain themselves and are in need of maintenance and sometimes vigorous defence.

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 12.54.10The prestige intellectuals confer upon antinomianism

soon communicates itself to nonintellectuals. What is good for the bohemian sooner or later becomes good for the unskilled worker, the unemployed, the welfare recipient — the very people most in need of boundaries to make their lives tolerable or allow them hope of improvement. The result is moral, spiritual, and emotional squalor, engendering fleeting pleasures and prolonged suffering.

Civilisation

Screen Shot 2015-08-09 at 12.55.17needs conservation as much as it needs change, and immoderate criticism, or criticism from the standpoint of utopian first principles, is capable of doing much — indeed devastating — harm. No man is so brilliant that he can work everything out for himself, so that the wisdom of the ages has nothing useful to tell him. To imagine otherwise is to indulge in the most egotistical of hubris.

The disastrous notions of the underclass about how to live

derive from the unrealistic, self-indulgent, and often fatuous ideas of social critics.

 

Names to attract suburban Satanists

Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 09.18.38Dalrymple is intrigued by the names of certain products of informal chemical factories:

  • Voodoo Gold. Merely antinomian
  • Damnation. Ditto
  • Pandora’s Box. Suggestive of the release of inner demons, or perhaps of talents (though the mythological precedent is not altogether happy)
  • Space Cadet. Suggestive of the exploration of the vast vacuum known as one’s inner space
  • Exodus. From what captivity are the consumers seeking escape? Who is their Charlton Heston? To what Promised Land are they to be led by this noid?
  • Annihilation. What of the immense progress that we think that we have made?

The lure of fundamentalist Islam

Römische Ruine mit einem Propheten, 1751, Giovanni Panini. Graf Harrach’sche Familiensammlung, Schloss Rohrau (outside Vienna)

Römische Ruine mit einem Propheten, 1751, Giovanni Panini. Graf Harrach’sche Familiensammlung, Schloss Rohrau (outside Vienna)

Dalrymple points out that many immigrants to Europe are drawn to radical Mohammedanism because they see it as an antidote to Western degeneracy.

Those parts of Western culture they see are…the least attractive side: gross promiscuity, the idea that one’s whim is law. They do not understand anything of the better aspects….If we lack the confidence to pass our culture on to our children it is hardly surprising we do not have the confidence to pass it on to other people.