Category Archives: British educational miracle

Dalrymple warns the Britishers

The doctor-writer points out that Britain’s enormous cultural, social and economic problems do not originate from membership of the European Union, nor will they be solved by exit from the Union, if exit ever occurs in fact rather than in name only. (More likely is that a second referendum will be staged at which the British people will be invited to give the right answer, or the means will be found simply to annul the referendum result.)

The country’s problems are so deep, Dalrymple argues, that they

can be solved only by something more resembling a religious revival than by any likely government action.

He gives examples of the sort of changes that are needed:

  • reform — or dismantle — the educational and social-security systems
  • liberalise the labour laws
  • repress crime much more firmly

And that’s just to start with.

However, he says,

expecting a population to bethink itself while simultaneously being offered political solutions that require no effortful cultural change is unreasonably optimistic.

This is a country in which

more than 50% of children are born out of wedlock and 20% do not eat a meal with another member of their household more than once every two weeks.

A dangerously high and perhaps unsustainable proportion of the population

is unfitted for productive life in a modern economy, having attained an abysmally low educational level despite (or because of?) considerable state expenditure. This section of the population is not merely indifferent to refinement of any kind – intellectual, æsthetic or of manners – but actively hostile to it. Similarly, it is not merely not anxious to learn, it is anxious not to learn.

This explains why Britain has persistently imported labour from Eastern Europe

to perform tasks in its service industries that ordinarily one might have expected its large fund of indigenous non-employed people to perform. Although these tasks require no special skills, they require certain personal qualities such as reliability, politeness, and willingness to adapt: and these the eligible local population lack entirely. No hotel-keeper, for example, would consider using British labour if he could get foreign.

Perhaps nothing, says Dalrymple, captures the levels of personal incompetence and lack of self-respect in Britain

than the fact that young men of the lowest social class are about half as likely to die in prison as they are if left at liberty. In prison, though adult, they are looked after, at least in a basic way, and told what to do. They are no longer free to pursue their dangerous and crudely self-indulgent lifestyle, in which distraction is the main occupation. In prison they receive the healthcare that, though it is free to them under the NHS, they are not responsible enough to seek when at liberty.

They do not know, because they have never been taught,

how to live in a minimally constructive fashion, though they were certainly not born ineducable.

Other comparable countries have similar problems, but none

has them to anything like the same extent.

The British educational system

Dalrymple describes it as

a conspiracy by the Department for Education.

This arm of the British bureaucracy, he explains,

acts as a sub-committee on behalf of the bourgeoisie, to protect the bourgeoisie from any competition from the lower orders by keeping them in a state of preternatural ignorance and uncouthness.

The British educational marvel

Dalrymple asks: 'How is it possible for so many children, not of defective intelligence, to emerge from an education costing approximately £60,000 per child, still unable to perform the simplest arithmetical operations and almost totally ignorant of history, geography and many other subjects? How is this miracle of inefficiency performed?

How is it possible for so many children, not of defective intelligence, to emerge from an education costing approximately £60,000 per child, still unable to perform the simplest arithmetical operations and almost totally ignorant of history, geography and many other subjects?

Dalrymple interviews a student at a university, studying a vocational subject in which arithmetical calculations are often necessary, who cannot multiply six by seven, except by counting it out laboriously on his fingers. Dalrymple comments:

Only the British State could perform this miracle.

And Dalrymple reports that approximately half of the people aged between 16 and 25 whom he encounters in his work as a doctor in a ‘deprived area’ reply to the question,

Are you good at arithmetic?

with a question of their own:

What is arithmetic?

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