Category Archives: British State

BBC Radio 1 should be abolished

Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 10.01.54The existence, says Dalrymple, of the British state broadcaster’s wireless station ‘Radio 1’, which excretes popular music of the worst kind,

is an example of the pervasive corporatist corruption of the British State.

Dalrymple writes:

Nobody who scans through the stations on his car radio can possibly be under the misapprehension that a taste for pop music is not adequately catered for by commercial broadcasters. There is no excuse for a State-promoted and publicly-funded pop music station.

Subsidy of what requires no subsidy

BBC Radio 1 is a means by which

public money is transferred, by royalties and other payments, into the pockets of people who are already rich, in the same way that development aid is the means by which poor people in rich countries give money to rich people in poor countries.

The only justification for a public service broadcaster

is that it broadcasts programmes that would not otherwise be produced, and that are of high artistic or intellectual worth.

But

our cultural and political élites have lost confidence in their judgment as to what is of intrinsic intellectual and artistic value. The measure of the BBC’s success is therefore the size of its audiences. The BBC becomes demotic.

The State and parastatal organisations, Dalrymple observes,

have an inherent and unstoppable tendency to swell grotesquely, especially in our corporatist society which increasingly resembles India during the Licence Raj, in which the public service did not serve and private enterprise was not enterprising.

You do realise, don’t you, that your horse is homosexual?

Equus africanus asinus

Equus africanus asinus

The law in England today, writes Dalrymple, is an

ass.

The British State

does not know how to deter, prevent, or punish.

In England, where

an aggressive popular culture glorifies egotistical impulsivity and denigrates self-control,

the violent and evil

may destroy other people’s lives with impunity, for the British State does not care in the least about protecting them,

Equus ferus caballus

Equus ferus caballus

being

indifferent to and incapable of the one task that inescapably belongs to it: preserving the peace and ensuring that its citizens may go about their lawful business in safety.

The result is that England has

the highest rate of (real) crime in the Western world.

But that does not mean the British State is inactive. It takes some things very seriously indeed. For example, there is the case of the Oxford student who, slightly drunk after celebrating the end of his exams, approached a mounted policeman. ‘Excuse me,’ he said. ‘Do you realise your horse is gay?’

The policeman called two squad cars to his aid, and, in a city in which it is notoriously difficult to interest the police in so trivial a matter as robbery or burglary, they arrived almost at once. The mounted policeman thought that the young man’s remark was likely to ’cause harassment, alarm or distress’. He was arrested and charged under the Public Order Act for having made a ‘homophobic remark’ and spent the night in jail. Brought before the magistrates the following day, he was fined.

Britain’s profound corruption

Screen Shot 2015-06-22 at 08.10.00The British State, writes Dalrymple, is

rotten.

Its rottenness is its

raison d’être.

The highest ranks

have been encouraged to arrogate to themselves large rewards from the public purse.

The nomenklatura’s

ostensible purposes — health, education, even defence — are the most feeble or transparent of pretexts; its real purpose is personal enrichment and institutional aggrandisement.

The level

of honesty — moral, intellectual and financial — of the population in Britain has declined drastically. We are now a nation of special pleaders on the take.

Equality of opportunity is

the politico-bureaucratic pretext for perpetuating inequality while destroying opportunity.

The well-merited result of this is and will be

impoverishment.

The uncolumnist

Hitchens is a onetime communist (Trotskyist, to be more precise) who unlike so many of this species has had the guts to admit that he was wrong and that the doctrines he espoused were evil

Hitchens is a onetime communist (Trotskyist, to be precise). Dalrymple points out, however, that unlike so many of his kind, Hitchens has had the courage and intellectual honesty to admit that he was profoundly wrong — indeed, crack-brained — and that the doctrines he espoused were murderous and evil

The Mail on Sunday censor has been at work. Peter Hitchens, the onetime Trotskyist who is the Rothermere-owned newspaper’s best writer, has had his columns spiked, the skewering being timed to coincide with the run-up to, and the aftermath of, the British general election.

It is speculated that the newspaper, recognising the commercial imperative of identification with the winning side, decided — after seeing which way the wind was blowing — that it would back the Conservatives. It would help that disreputable party secure a convincing victory. It gagged Hitchens so as to ensure that readers would not be influenced to follow his (wise) counsel. This has long been that right-thinking, decent people ought to desist from voting for the corrupt Tories.

According to the magazine Private Eye, Hitchens (who has not been silenced altogether — there remains much engaging material on his blog) is ‘talking to his lawyers’.

Reviewed by Dalrymple: Hitchens's 2003 polemic

Reviewed by Dalrymple: Hitchens’s 2003 polemic

Dalrymple reviews Hitchens’s A Brief History of Crime

Hitchens’s rage at what has been done to British society is more than justified, Dalrymple writes. In A Brief History of Crime, Hitchens is especially astute on the matter of the failings of the British criminal justice system. Hitchens has discovered, Dalrymple points out, that the systemic corruption causes people no longer

to believe very deeply in the majesty of the law or the legitimacy of the British State; and this disillusion in turn must lead to a kind of resentful apathy.

Hitchens appreciates, says Dalrymple, that such a state of mind

will be highly receptive to authoritarianism: for order will come to be valued over freedom. As the author points out, this is useful to many politicians and it explains why the rigorous enforcement of the law is so essential to liberty.

The spike: destination of Hitchens’s two most recent columns for the British newspaper the Mail on Sunday

The spike: destination of Hitchens’s most recent articles for the British newspaper the Mail on Sunday

Dalrymple writes that in A Brief History of Crime,

Mr Hitchens traces the descent of Britain, in only a few decades, from being one of the best-ordered societies in the western world to being among the worst-ordered.

Hitchens places the blame, explains Dalrymple,

firmly where it belongs: on a supine and pusillanimous political establishment that, for four decades at least, has constantly retreated before the verbal onslaught of liberal intellectuals whose weapons have been mockery allied to sentimental guilt about their prosperous and comfortable lives, and whose aim has been to liberate themselves from personally irksome moral constraints, without regard to the consequences for those less favourably placed in society than themselves.

How Hitchens became an unperson at the Mail on Sunday, as reported by the magazine Private Eye

How Hitchens became an unperson at the Mail on Sunday, as reported by the magazine Private Eye

Dalrymple says that Hitchens’s outrage at the compromising and besmirching of British traditions, values and liberties is palpably

of the genuine and generous variety that comes from a real understanding of the conditions which millions of people now endure — unlike the simulated and self-regarding outrage that is common among liberal reformers.

Examining the way in which British peace and order have gradually disappeared,

Mr Hitchens in every case finds the self-satisfaction of people such as Roy Jenkins, who introduced lenient treatment for criminals without ever having personally to face the social consequences.

Dalrymple thinks Hitchens

Not so optimistic any more: Hitchens discusses the election result on his blog

Not so optimistic now: Hitchens discusses the election result on his blog

is too optimistic about the prospect of the nation coming to its senses: the march of ‘progressive’ sociology through the institutions has been so thorough that there is no constituency left which could preserve the kind of traditional limited polity that he believes Britain once was and which he would like to see restored.

Judging from Hitchens’s pronouncements on his blog and on Twitter since the election, he is no longer nearly as optimistic as he was when he wrote A Brief History of Crime, which Dalrymple commends as

a lucid polemic by a man who is so obviously more interested in the welfare of the common man than in the approbation of his peers.

Hitchens in the People's Republic of the Rothermeres: now you see him, now you don't

Now you read him, now you don’t

 

Hitchens as he was: the conceited Marxist participant in cheap middle-class protest

Hitchens as he was: the conceited Marxist, active in cheap middle-class protest. He gave up the Leninist claptrap along with the donkey-jacket many years ago

Ukip must be declared beyond the pale, unclean, like a mediæval leper

The British state broadcaster is determined to place issues raised by the populists beyond the range of permissible political discussion. You can have any opinion you like, so long as it is ours.

The British state broadcaster is determined to place issues raised by right-wing populists (as opposed to left-wing populists) beyond the range of permissible political discussion. You can have any opinion you like, so long as it is ours.

 

Britons who hate and repudiate civilisation

Screen Shot 2015-04-04 at 13.58.15British incivility has a militant or ideological edge

Increasingly, writes Dalrymple, the English

are a people who know neither inner nor outer restraint. They turn to aggression, if not to violence, the moment they are thwarted, even in trifles.

And with an increasingly corrupt police force and judiciary, those who are neither aggressive nor violent

are by no means sure that the law will take their side in the event of a fracas.

Surveys have shown that half of the population wants to leave the country,

Screen Shot 2015-04-04 at 13.57.29to flee the other half.

The British are not only violent. They are filthy.

The British are by far the dirtiest people in the Western world, a sign of their unsocial mindset.

The paralysis of the public administration

induces a state of despair in the more civilised half of the population. Practically no behaviour is beyond the pale for the British state.

Screen Shot 2015-04-04 at 14.17.03The freedom to behave badly

is almost the only freedom valued by, or left to, young Britons.

Is it any surprise that so many are desperate to emigrate? The people who want to flee Britain

The flight from barbarism The flight from barbarism

are not economic migrants. It is not high taxes that they object to (many want to move to France, where taxes are not low), but barbarism.

The emigrants

are cultural refugees in search of a more civilised homeland, where fewer people are uncouth or militantly vulgar.

If Ofsted is the only guardian of educational standards in Britain, the country faces a grim future

Trojan horse

Trojan horse

The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills should be abolished, Dalrymple argues. The revelation that schools regularly deceive Ofsted inspectors is

emblematic of what the British State now is: a hall of distorting mirrors. Schools resort to all manner of subterfuges on the day of inspections in order to appear better than they are. And this corruption is not a malfunction of Ofsted; it is its main purpose. It is instituted to deceive the public into thinking that the government cares about educational standards. How else can one explain the fact that Ofsted warns schools of its impending inspections? Such a warning is a virtual incitement to deception; at the very least, it is a indication that the inspectors want to be deceived. It is by such means that standards can fall in reality while they rise in the virtual world of the government statement.

(2012)

The sentimentally therapeutic view of prison

Screen Shot 2015-07-25 at 09.05.59Dalrymple discusses the British intelligentsia’s

long-held wish that the punishment imposed by the criminal justice system be therapeutic rather than merely protective and deterrent.

Criminals, he points out,

know very well the effectiveness of punishment, which is why they mete it out to each other with the utmost celerity if one of their number breaks their code.

The sentimentalists encourage

the bad faith of so many criminals, who know they have society on the run.

All talk and no trousers

Screen Shot 2013-11-09 at 11.35.17Margaret Thatcher

spoke too much and did too little…Her…strident tone, that was capable…of cutting glass, gave even her best ideas a bad reputation, as if they had…been put into practice when…they had not.

By every measure, the public sector looms larger in Britain today than it did in 1979. Dalrymple puts it this way: Margaret Thatcher found the public sector inefficient

 and left it inefficient and corrupt.

Her noisy rhetoric against the state

disguised the fact that under her…the…state remained as preponderant…as ever…Government expenditure…increased, above all in areas such as social security.

Britons ever, ever, ever shall be slaves

The English have become ‘natural slaves‘, says Dalrymple. They ‘expect and allow officialdom to rule their lives’.