Category Archives: charmlessness

Drunken retching as self-realisation

Screen Shot 2015-07-03 at 08.15.24The British, Dalrymple points out, are

despised throughout the world wherever they congregate in any numbers.

In any English town on any night of the week you will see

scenes of charmless vulgarity, in which thousands of scantily clad, lumpen sluts scream drunkenly, and men vomit proudly in the gutters.

It has been suggested that the English might be able to develop civilised Mediterranean café culture. Dalrymple remarks:

You might as well preach the comforts of the igloo and the tastiness of whale blubber to the Maasai.

Much of the British population believes

not only that it has no duty to control itself, but that it is harmful to try to do so. It believes that screaming, smashing bottles, vomiting, urinating against walls in full view of others, swaying drunkenly in the gutter, and hailing strangers to give them lifts, are essential to its health and emotional wellbeing, that drinking in this fashion is Aristotelian catharsis.

For the English,

there can be no higher accolade for a night out than that no trace of it remains in the brain. ‘Getting wasted’ and then behaving antisocially before passing out is the pinnacle of social life.

Just as the British government is so corrupt that it does not know that it is corrupt, so the British people

are so lacking in self-respect that they do not know that self-respect is desirable.

In England, drunkenness

to the point of brutish amnesia is regarded as admirable, a high achievement.

Dalrymple mère on the English

Screen Shot 2013-04-21 at 16.25.27

Yeah, I’m British. Now fuck off!

When Dalrymple’s mother arrived in England as a refugee from Nazi Germany

she found the people admirable and the culture possessed of a deep and seductive, if subtle and by no means transparent or obvious, charm. She was struck by the orderliness and restraint of political life, and the gentleness of conduct in public. Behaviour when ill or injured was stoic.

Two-thirds of a century later, she found the British people

rude, dishonest, and charmless. A transvaluation seemed to have taken place. The human qualities that people valued and inculcated when she arrived had become mocked, despised, and repudiated. Extravagance of gesture, vehemence of expression, vainglorious boastfulness, self-exposure, absence of inhibition — the old modesty scorned.