Category Archives: dithyrambs

Postcards from North Wales

Madoc Books, Llandudno. The Welsh Buchmendel 'deals mainly in books of Welsh interest and in the Welsh language. Sometimes he has very rare books, of which only one or two other copies may exist in the world. He tries to interest Welsh universities and public libraries in them, but they always reply that the books are too obscure for anyone ever to want to look at them. The books, it turns out, end up on the shelves of American institutions'

Madoc Books, Llandudno. The Welsh Buchmendel ‘deals mainly in books of Welsh interest and in the Welsh language. Sometimes he has very rare books, of which only one or two other copies may exist in the world. He tries to interest Welsh universities and public libraries in them, but they always reply that the books are too obscure for anyone ever to want to look at them. The books, it turns out, end up on the shelves of American institutions’

'Elegant Victorian seaside resort'

‘Elegant Victorian seaside resort’

'Beautiful little town on the Menai Straits'

‘Beautiful little town on the Menai Straits’

'The chapels—Sinai, Bethel, Zion, and so on—are closing, converted into luxury homes or garden centers or even restaurants (I can recall when restaurants remained almost unknown in North Wales)'

‘The chapels—Sinai, Bethel, Zion, and so on—are closing, converted into luxury homes or garden centres or even restaurants (I can recall when restaurants remained almost unknown in North Wales)’

'It’s all too easy in the heartachingly beautiful landscapes of North Wales, and in the human warmth of its villages, to descend to dithy-rambs about the simple life. But the genuinely simple life here, before the advent of modernity and such amenities as hot water, was harsh and difficult. No doubt narrow-mindedness and bigotry abounded, too'

‘It’s all too easy in the heartachingly beautiful landscapes of North Wales, and in the human warmth of its villages, to descend to dithyrambs about the simple life. But the genuinely simple life here, before the advent of modernity and such amenities as hot water, was harsh and difficult. No doubt narrow-mindedness and bigotry abounded, too’