Category Archives: educational standards

Why politicians want to lower the voting age further

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Mila

Dalrymple notes that

the widening and lengthening of education has gone hand in hand with a decline in the civility of discourse.

Adolescence

is the age neither of good taste nor of wisdom, which no doubt is why some politicians want to lower the voting age even further. After all, what many politicians most value in voters is gullibility.

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United in decadence

Screen Shot 2015-06-13 at 07.43.52France and Britain are

very similar in their inability to tackle the problems that confront them. Both countries are sleepwalking to insignificance and international oblivion.

The French

Screen Shot 2015-06-13 at 08.11.53cannot tackle the rigidity of their labour market, that makes the creation of new jobs or new enterprises so difficult, because no politician has the guts to do it. Everyone in France is ready to struggle, even violently, for the preservation of his own little privileges and protections (while pretending to do so for the good of humanity – the French are just as hypocritical as the British). France’s social model produces fonctionnaires like the savannah produces termites, and allows certain categories of workers to retire on a very high percentage of their salary almost as soon as they have begun to work.

Screen Shot 2015-06-13 at 08.16.42The British

cannot tackle their abysmally low educational and cultural standards, which are obvious even on landing at a British airport, because no politician has the guts to do it — politicians prefer the tried and trusted policy of après moi, le déluge. Successive British governments have comprehensively destroyed the British educational system: a high percentage of British children leave school less literate than Tanzanian peasants [and this is reflected in low productivity and generalised gormlessness].

La belle France, left, and England, dear England

La belle France, left, and England, dear England

British educational degeneracy and cultural debasement

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 22.39.52Observers ask, writes Dalrymple, why British productivity

has not risen of latter years, though the economy has ‘recovered’ in the sense that its output has increased. This can only mean that people are working longer hours or that more of them are working, or both.

Dalrymple does not find this puzzling.

I think you have only to walk down a British street — an average one, not one in a favoured area — to solve the puzzle. The abysmal educational and cultural level of the people by comparison with that of the people in such a street in any comparable country is striking and obvious.

China’s growing might

Public life in the corrupt and decaying societies of the West, writes Dalrymple,

is frivolous without gaiety, earnest without seriousness.

Western economies such as Britain’s

cannot compete with China’s in cost of labour, of course.

But the success of China is based not just on cheap labour but on

Screen Shot 2015-06-05 at 22.27.21a powerful combination of cheap labour and an educational system that is far more serious than Britain’s.

While the British

are so obsessed with supposed social justice that they are prepared to tolerate any degree of mediocrity, China fosters talent in a Darwinian fashion, in the hope and expectation that everyone will benefit in the long run.

Michel Houellebecq's Les Particules élémentaires (1998) in English translation

Michel Houellebecq‘s Les Particules élémentaires (1998) in English translation

The stage has been reached where there is practically

nothing that the British can do better than the Chinese.

At the same time Westerners, and especially Western Europeans,

have destroyed all forms of social solidarity other than handouts from the state.

Westerners are left with

an atomised society in which no one feels he has any duty to anyone else. Widespread social, or rather antisocial, disturbances are the result.

If Ofsted is the only guardian of educational standards in Britain, the country faces a grim future

Trojan horse

Trojan horse

The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills should be abolished, Dalrymple argues. The revelation that schools regularly deceive Ofsted inspectors is

emblematic of what the British State now is: a hall of distorting mirrors. Schools resort to all manner of subterfuges on the day of inspections in order to appear better than they are. And this corruption is not a malfunction of Ofsted; it is its main purpose. It is instituted to deceive the public into thinking that the government cares about educational standards. How else can one explain the fact that Ofsted warns schools of its impending inspections? Such a warning is a virtual incitement to deception; at the very least, it is a indication that the inspectors want to be deceived. It is by such means that standards can fall in reality while they rise in the virtual world of the government statement.

(2012)