Category Archives: Erdoğan, Recep Tayyip

Increase your IQ. Exterminate all the brutes!

Dalrymple explains that Masie Nguema Biyogo Ñegue Ndong, better known as Francisco Macías Nguema,

was democratically elected but no democrat. As Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is reported to have said, democracy is a train — you alight once you have reached your destination, in Macías Nguema’s case, the killing or exile of half his country’s population and the enslavement of the rest.

Among Macías Nguema’s many peculiarities was

a hatred of people who wore glasses, whom he assumed to be intellectuals and therefore dangerous. I surmise that this hatred had its origin in the three times he failed his exams to enter the colonial civil service.

He restored his self-esteem

by the degradation of his countrymen in general, and people with glasses in particular. If you kill all the people of above-average intelligence, your chances of having above-average intelligence yourself rise.

A stalking horse for unfreedom

Dalrymple writes that the burkini affair

leaves me uneasy. There are two current demands in our societies: the right to mark ourselves out from others, and the right not to be discriminated against if we do so. These two rights are not logically incompatible, but if too strongly insisted upon simultaneously will destroy the cohesion of any society.

Moreover,

I cannot help but recall the words of Mr Erdoğan, well before he became as eminent and powerful as he has since become. Democracy is a train (or tram, in some citations) which is useful in getting you to where you want to go, and then you get off.

Could it be, asks Dalrymple,

that the demand for freedom is here a stalking horse for unfreedom, that a demand for freedom for oneself will end in a demand for the abrogation of the freedoms of others? This would not be unprecedented in recent history: the communists demanded full liberal-democratic freedoms in order later to be able to destroy them.

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Erdoğan is right to accuse the EU of insincerity

Screen Shot 2016-08-13 at 17.57.44The people who run the EU, writes Dalrymple,

cannot make up their minds which is more important to them: their desire to expand their empire and bring Turkey into their orbit, or their fear of a still-Moslem country that would be the largest in landmass and demographically in Europe.

What Brussels would really like

is to bring the secular, Westernised part of the population into Europe while leaving the ignorant Moslem peasantry where it is.

Rather convenient

How convenient

This is not possible,

hence the endless negotiations that never seem to lead anywhere. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s threat to reintroduce the death penalty therefore comes as a godsend, a pretext on which to end the negotiations on an apparent matter of principle. We in Europe can put up with anything except the death penalty.

Then

Then

Now

Now

They do these things better in provincial theatres

My first reaction when seeing President Erdogan standing at the foot of the stairs of his palace in Ankara, said to be several times larger than Versailles, was to laugh (I am not a Turkish taxpayer). Surely it was some kind of film set, to be dismantled when the film has been completed. They would do better in Hollywood, or even in Las Vegas. At least there it would be fun. As for the janissaries that Mr. Erdogan now uses for ceremonial purposes, any provincial theatrical costumier would be ashamed of their tawdry inauthenticity.

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the Turkish president, greets Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas. Dalrymple writes: ‘My first reaction when seeing President Erdoğan standing at the foot of the stairs of his palace in Ankara, said to be several times larger than Versailles, was to laugh (I am not a Turkish taxpayer). Surely it was some kind of film set, to be dismantled when the film has been completed. They would do better in Hollywood, or even in Las Vegas (at least there it would be fun). As for the janissaries that Mr Erdogan uses for ceremonial purposes, any provincial theatrical costumier would be ashamed of their tawdry inauthenticity.’

Cumhurbaşkanlığı Sarayı, Ankara

Cumhurbaşkanlığı Sarayı, Ankara. It has 1,150 rooms and cost about €500m to build