Category Archives: European politico-administrative élite

Macron’s manifold flaws

Jumping into a taxi in Paris, Dalrymple gets talking to the (Vietnamese) driver about the presidential election. The driver says he is not a fan of Marine Le Pen, but if in the second round she is pitted against Emmanuel Macron, he will vote for her. Dalrymple asks what puts him off the male aspirant. The driver points out that Macron

  • is an unknown quantity
  • has an unpleasing face — not exactly ugly, but hard, ruthless and predatory
  • is too young
  • is a bungler
  • has enjoyed a too meteoric rise
  • is a half-cocked tinkerer at the margins rather than the radical reformer needed in these times
  • lacks experience
  • has a personal life that is rather odd (maybe he is his wife’s puppet)
  • is too plainly the candidate of the European political élite, something which of course counts greatly against him

Why corrupt élites so love the unitary European state

Screen Shot 2016-02-21 at 11.03.45 A ‘project’ that no one but the political class wants

To bypass the wishes of the people, writes Dalrymple, politicos

reintroduced the constitution as a treaty, to be ratified by parliaments alone. Only the Irish had the guts—or was it the foolhardiness?—to hold a referendum on the issue. Unfortunately, the Irish people got the answer wrong. They voted no, despite their political leaders’ urging that they vote yes. No doubt the people will be given an opportunity in the future—or several opportunities, if necessary—to correct their mistake and get the answer right, after which there will be no more referenda.

What could explain the Irish obduracy?

Several explanations came forth, among them Irish xenophobia and intellectual backwardness. The narrowest economic self-interest was also said to have played a part.

Another explanation

was that Irish citizens had been frightened by the proposal of the French finance minister to equalise tax rates throughout Europe, thus destroying unfair competition (all competition is unfair, unless the French win). No prizes for guessing whether the high tax rates of France or the low rates of Ireland would become the new standard.

Anyway, what does it matter if referendum after referendum, in Denmark, France, the Netherlands, Ireland, and just possibly Britain, defeats the proposals of the European political class?

The proposals can always be enacted regardless, by other means. What the people of Europe want is irrelevant.

The political class

loves the unitary European state precisely because it so completely escapes democratic or any other oversight (let alone control).

For this class the superstate is also

a giant pension fund.

However, Dalrymple warns that

tensions and frustrations in Europe have a history of expressing themselves in nasty ways.

The shame of being German

Cologne is noted for its vibrant nightlife

Cologne is noted for its vibrant nightlife

The European Union, writes Dalrymple, is

a bureaucratic monster, unaccountable to anyone resembling a normal human being.

It is also a

vast pension plan for ageing or burnt-out politicians who cannot any longer face the inconveniences of having to be elected.

Why are the Germans so keen on it? Why do they yearn so much for a European identity? Dalrymple’s answer:

So that they can stop being German. This, of course, will deceive no one.

Screen Shot 2016-01-09 at 07.12.44

Feeble-mindedness of the European federalists

Screen Shot 2015-06-20 at 09.56.03Harnessing hippos to a stagecoach

Europe, writes Dalrymple, is again

sleepwalking to cataclysm.

European federation is a bad idea, but

the mere badness of an idea does nothing to halt its progress.

The arguments of the European federalists

Screen Shot 2015-06-20 at 10.31.46are trotted out with monotonous regularity, like the stories of someone with Alzheimer’s, and anyone who raises objections, however obvious and unanswerable, is compared to a rabid nationalist, as if to be attached to a national identity were a symptom of hating everyone else. There are such rabid nationalists, to be sure: forced federation is the best way of ensuring their increase in numbers and influence.

Such pooling of sovereignty as has occurred in Europe

Screen Shot 2015-06-20 at 10.45.40has held its prosperity back. The currency union without any kind of fiscal union has proved disastrous for several countries, and is economically deleterious for all.

The further step of fiscal union

could only be imposed by an unelected, authoritarian bureaucracy upon countries unwilling to comply, and whose interests might not be served by compliance.

Sooner or later, a federation

would lead to war, or at least to revolution.

Screen Shot 2015-06-20 at 10.26.32

Dangerous excitements of a Sunday afternoon in Aberystwyth

Screen Shot 2015-06-07 at 16.20.51

Dalrymple says (from 7:04) that Herman Van Rompuy, former president of the European Council and the ‘finest flower’ of the European élite, makes ‘a Sunday afternoon in Aberystwyth seem dangerously exciting’

 

Die Nationalsozialistische Schottische Partei

From the British magazine Private Eye

From the British magazine Private Eye

The Scottish National Party, writes Dalrymple, are national socialists.

In economics, they are socialist, or at least corporatist; in politics, their rhetoric is nationalist. They are, in fact, national socialists.

Self-determination is not their true goal, of course. Dalrymple observes that the SNP’s real, though unacknowledged, aim is

increased access of the Scottish political class to the European politico-administrative élite.

This explains why, Dalrymple writes, the SNP are

firmly in favour of the European Union, an entity dedicated to extinguishing national sovereignty in Europe, and the formation of a superstate with few effective checks on the politico-administrative élite.

What they really want

What they really want

The SNP’s policies are, naturally, highly statist.

All private companies would operate, in effect, by licence from the government.

The SNP would hold

Welcome to Scotland

Welcome to Scotland

all the levers of political power, including powers of indoctrination.

Even before the last referendum,

an atmosphere of mild intimidation prevailed, such that those who opposed independence felt it better not to voice their opposition too loudly