Category Archives: feminism

The sort of thing one would expect in a dictatorship

Out come the candles: women must be believed qua women

Femaoism on the rise

Dalrymple writes that Brett Kavanaugh’s statement to the committee after Christine Blasey Ford had given her evidence

was a very bad one. As he was soon to recognise, he spoke in a way in which he should not have spoken and said things that he should not have said. To me he sounded more like a politician than a judge.

However, Dalrymple points out that those who demonstrated to the effect that the women who accused Kavanaugh of misconduct were to be believed qua women

are guilty of flagrant sex stereotyping. They degrade their sex and render it less than human.

Dalrymple does not say that Christine Blasey Ford lied, only that

to claim that she did not do so because women ex officio do not tell lies is to diminish women as human beings.

What Ford said

was not substantiated, and insofar as there is evidence other than what she said, the evidence is against her. This is not the same as saying that her testimony was untrue; but no criminal prosecution could be brought on the basis of what she said, and even a civil case would fail. What we are left with is a mere possibility, and it seems to me unlikely that, in the absence of startling new evidence, it will ever amount to more than that.

The protesters showed

how little they respected due and established process and how fragile was their belief in the rule of law. They would let unsubstantiated allegations—provided they were of the right sort—wreck a man’s career and perhaps deprive him of a living, certainly stain his reputation for the rest of his life if not longer, principally because they didn’t like his views. This is the kind of thing one would expect in a totalitarian dictatorship, complete with staged outrage and accusations against which there can be no complete defence.

The effect of the episode is the advance of the cause of what Dalrymple calls

femaoism, an amalgam of feminism and Maoism. For some people, there is a lot of pleasure to be had in hatred, especially when it is made the meaning of life.

Femaoism

How the West cringes before the Mahometans

Not one of Dalrymple's favourite journalists

Not one of Dalrymple’s favourite journalists

Polly Toynbee of the London newspaper the Guardian is, Dalrymple admits,

not one of my favourite journalists.

But Dalrymple notes (from 1:05:09) that Toynbee has said that

if she must choose between her feminism and her multiculturalism, she chooses her feminism. So she will argue for the protection of Moslem women.

The problem of the cultural cringe before the Mohammedans goes quite far in British administration, Dalrymple points out. He used to have many young Moslem patients

who had been denied access to school by their parents. The authorities never once did anything about it. But if a white working-class girl didn’t go to school, the parents might be threatened with legal action or imprisonment. A considerable part of this is fear — straightforward physical fear.

Furthermore, on the question of Islam as on so many other matters, Western politicians and intellectuals

are always on the lookout for an opportunity to demonstrate the breadth of their sympathies. This does a lot of harm.

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Justin Trudeau gesticulates in the direction of the Musulman fundament

She who must be obeyed

Screen Shot 2016-03-24 at 22.26.01The dreary tyranny of political correctness

Dalrymple looks up suicide in an online compilation of drivel that purports to be an encyclopædia, and steps into the following ordure:

As Baron d’Holbach pointed out, the contract between an individual and her society is a conditional one, presupposing ‘mutual advantages between the contracting parties’. Hence, if a society fails to fulfil its obligations under the contract, namely to provide individuals with the goods needed for a decent quality of life, then the individual is not morally required to live in order to reciprocate an arrangement that society has already reneged on. Moreover, once an individual has discharged her obligations under this societal contract, she no longer is under an obligation to continue her life. Hence, the aged or others who have already made substantial contributions to societal welfare would be morally permitted to commit suicide under this argument.

The baron was a philosophic radical, of course

The baron was a philosophic radical

One possible cause of loss of the will to continue living, Dalrymple points out, is

the impotent observation of the creep of political correctness through academe.

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Sexmobocracy

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Yet the feminists are silent — deafeningly so

And hardly a peep from the feminists

Muslim men, writes Dalrymple, are

integrated enough to want Westernised lives for themselves, but not integrated enough to want such lives for their sisters.

Or even for any non-Muslim women who happen to be around.

It is not, says Dalrymple,

  difficult to see the reasons for this.

But

where are our feminists, fearlessly fighting for speech codes and the use of the impersonal she in academic books, when women suffer such severe oppression? Hardly a peep is heard from them.

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The harridan-and-harpy wing of British politics

Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 15.02.04 An article reflecting the views of such people is read, or endured, by Dalrymple. It is about ‘gender inequality’ in politics and society, and is both

dull, as all such articles are bound to be,

and impoverishing of the English language. However, the virtue of the article, to be found in the London newspaper the Observer, is that it lavishly furnishes Dalrymple with opportunities to indulge what he describes as

Screen Shot 2015-03-08 at 14.59.45one of the most delightful of emotions,

viz., righteous indignation.

The article irritates our man intensely, finally reducing the doctor-writer to

impotent rage.

Guide to Asiatic Birmingham

Birmingham Central Mosque, Highgate

Birmingham Central Mosque, Highgate

Former longtime resident Theodore Dalrymple answers your questions

How many Muslim Brummies are there?

In the last census, in 2011, 21.8 percent of the inhabitants of Britain’s second-largest city said that they were Muslim.

Will the figure rise?

The percentage is likely to rise because of higher birth rates among Muslims, immigration, and the departure of white Christians.

What have been the movements in and out of Brummagem?

Residents of Birmingham who identified themselves as ‘white British’ declined by 11 percent between 2001 and 2011, while the ‘white Irish’ declined by 33 percent. The proportion of Christians would have decreased further had it not been for the arrival of Eastern Europeans. The Muslim Pakistani and Bangladeshi populations increased over those ten years by 40 and 50 percent respectively.

Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif, Small Heath

Central Jamia Mosque Ghamkol Sharif, Small Heath

Are there no-go areas?

Since ethnic and religious groups are not scattered evenly throughout Birmingham, the population in some areas is overwhelmingly Muslim. White women report being verbally abused there, as sluts ex officio, though it would not be true to say that any of the areas are truly no-go.

Where might I dine?

Spot the difference: Jamiah Masjid Mohiuddin Siddiquia, Aston. To the left is Christ Church Baptist Chapel (1865), which long ago fell into disuse. It appears to be the church hall (1888) that has been converted into the mosque, with the cross now hacked off

Spot the difference: Jamiah Masjid Mohiuddin Siddiquia, Aston. To the far left is Christ Church Baptist Chapel (1865), no longer used for worship, having been made into flats. It appears to be the red church hall (1888) that has been converted into the masjid, with the cross hacked off

One of these Muslim areas is notable for its profusion of small, cheap, and good restaurants, patronised by the rest of the population.

Do these districts resemble the banlieues?

No part of Birmingham is as cut off from the rest of the city as are some of the banlieues of Paris. Physical (if not social) mixing of populations is evident.

What is the relative educational, social and economic level of Birmingham’s Muslims, and to what extent are they prone to criminality or semi-criminality?

Before and after: at Jamiah Masjid Mohiuddin Siddiquia in Aston, someone has climbed up to the roof and hacked off the cross

Before and after: at Jamiah Masjid Mohiuddin Siddiquia in Aston, a zealous Mohammedan (whether a supple-limbed imam or a layman is unknown) has climbed up onto the roof and righteously hacked off the cross, doubtless to the cheers and cries of Allahu Akbar! of the throng below

In Britain, Muslim populations like those in Birmingham have relatively poor educational attainment and high rates of youth unemployment, crime, and imprisonment.

Hindus and Sikhs are much more successful than Muslims and than whites (who no longer have any religion) in life, are they not?

Hindus and Sikhs, present also in large numbers, have lower rates of youth unemployment than whites and much lower levels of crime than whites. The Sikhs have the second-highest average household wealth when such wealth is broken down by religious affiliation.

Place households in order of their respective wealth by religious persuasion.

Sikh households are richer than Christian ones; Muslim households are much poorer.

What do you say to the suggestion that the city government has exhibited a high degree of moral cowardice in the way it approaches the matter of the growing appeal of jihadism?

Birmingham Central Library: women-only tables

The great cringe: Birmingham Central Library provides apartheid-inspired, Muslim-women-only tables so that study of the Koran and the Hadith need not be confined to men; their wives and concubines may also gain access to the texts

Supposedly to placate Muslim sentiment, local authorities have sometimes agreed to or imposed measures worthy of an apartheid regime. For example, the Birmingham Central Library provided women-only tables, in practice for the use of Muslim women.

Who came up with the idea of Muslim-women-only tables at Birmingham Central Library?

I don’t know whether this gesture came in response to a request or was an anticipatory cringe; the argument in its favour would almost certainly have been that without such separate facilities Muslim women would not have been allowed by their males to use the library at all.

Would a demand for Christian-women-only or Hindu-women-only or Buddhist-women-only or Sikh-women-only library tables have been acceded to by the Birmingham city government?

It is unlikely that such an argument would have succeeded for any other religious or social group, and indeed it would have provoked feminist ire, in this case notably absent.

Neither seen nor heard in Birmingham

The sisters: neither seen nor heard in Birmingham

Why was it absent? Why no feminist fury in this case? Why no library-users’ sit-in? Why no demonstrations against this grotesque denial of the gender equality that it has taken so many years and effort to achieve? Why no lingerie torched in protest at Birmingham Central Library’s fostering of a collective image of submissive females who must be set apart to protect their ‘purity’? Why no occupation of the library by protesters? Why no petitions? Why no revival of the anti-apartheid movement? Why no Gender Equality Speakout and Festival in Centenary Square? Why no resolutions to reclaim the library and liberate it in the cause of equality? Why the silence?

Fear.

Wife-beating etiquette

Calling all Brummie believers: wife-beating rules

Deafening silence of the feminists

But you turned out to be too cowardly to use it

You may have found it but you turned out to be too cowardly to use it

Female victimhood. Yet where two pieties — feminism and multiculturalism — come into conflict, writes Dalrymple,

the only way of preserving both is an indecent silence.

He points out that the British authorities

have turned a cowardly blind eye to the real nature of forced marriages in order to avoid the charge of racial discrimination.

In this way, in parts of England’s urban Midlands and North and elsewhere in the country,

the life of the Punjab continues amid the architecture of the Industrial Revolution.

(2004)