Category Archives: Haiti

Oxfam, criminal conspiracy

Dalrymple writes that for years he banged on that Oxfam was

a criminal organisation.

People, he says,

would roll their eyes.

He asks:

Are they rolling their eyes now?

Orgies with underage prostitutes in Haïti are, Dalrymple writes,

the least of it. The orgies are a market-driven stimulus for the Haïtian economy, if an extremely tasteless and immoral one. That is more than can be said for most of Oxfam’s activities.

Bogus charity’s extreme hypocrisy

Oxfam’s real aim, he points out,

is to provide employment to those who work for it. (Governments are of course the biggest donors to this corrupt scheme.)

Legalised fraud

Money donated to Oxfam ends up in the pockets of those who work for it, including the staff, numbering 888 at the last count, at the fake charity’s grandiloquent head office in London.

Dalrymple notes that

the hypocrisy of this legalised fraud is symbolic of very many modern activities.

Oxfam

is not the only criminal in this field, and may not be the worst. The field itself is criminal.

The merit of Trump’s characterisation of certain foreign countries

Dalrymple writes that the American president succeeded with his remarks in

exposing a contradiction in the minds of his opponents.

Those who objected to his language

were inclined also to object to his proposal to return migrants from those countries to their countries of origin on the grounds that—well, that those countries were as Mr Trump said they were, and that it would therefore be cruel and inhumane to return them there.

The brutish Donald Trump

It is, writes Dalrymple,

true that Haiti is in many respects a terrible place, which is why so many people want to leave it. Yet it pained me to hear of it spoken of in such terms, because there is so much more to it than the vulgar epithet suggests. The history of Haiti is a moving one, the people valiant and their culture of enormous interest. I have been only twice, but it exerts a hold on the imagination that can never be released. The tragedy and glory of the country are mixed, and symbolise the tragedy and glory of human life.

If Dalrymple were a Haitian who had fled Haiti in search of a better and much easier life, he

should nevertheless not have been pleased to hear it spoken of in this dismissive way, indeed I would have been hurt by it. I do not presume to know how familiar Mr Trump is with Haitian history, culture, and so forth, although I have my suspicions; and of course he has principally to consider the interests of the United States and Americans, not those of Haiti and Haitians. But what he said was not witty or wise, it was hurtful and insulting. I cannot see the giving of offence by the mere employment of crude and vulgar language as anything but a vice, and it is difficult to say whether it is worse if the person employing it knows or does not know what he is doing. If he knows, he cannot care; and if he does not know, he is a something of a brute.

The superiority of Air France over British Airways

Dalrymple will not go into

the rights and wrongs of the managers’ decision to make 2,900 employees of Air France redundant, and whether such a decision was in effect forced on the managers by

  • the financial situation of the company
  • the intransigence of the staff who militated against any kind of change in their very comfortable billets
  • the excessive social charges that the French state imposes upon all employers in France
  • the subsidies received by some its main competitors

He will not go into the matter because he admits to

a weakness for Air France: I find its service agreeable by comparison with, say, that of British Airways, which is as lumpen as the nation of which it is the principal carrier, even though Air France is strike-prone and such a strike once left me stranded in Port-au-Prince. I did not mind this very much, for it allowed me to make the acquaintance of the eminent German author of books about Haiti, Hans Christoph Buch.

In the departure lounge

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An airline strike leaves Dalrymple stranded in Port-au-Prince, but it’s not all bad: he falls into conversation with a fellow passenger, Hans Christoph Buch, author of the trilogy of novels Die Hochzeit von Port-au-Prince (1984), Haïti Chérie (1990) and Rede des toten Kolumbus am Tag des Jüngsten Gerichts (1992).

Dalrymple and Buch have written books with the same title: Dalrymple’s Monrovia Mon Amour was published (under his real name Anthony Daniels) in 1992, Buch’s (with illustrations by Wolfgang Petrick) 10 years later.

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One of Dalrymple's photographs in his Monrovia Mon Amour (1992)

One of Dalrymple’s photographs in his Monrovia Mon Amour (1992)

One of Wolfgang Petrick's illustrations in Hans Christoph Buch's Hiroshima Mon Amour (2002)

One of Wolfgang Petrick’s illustrations in Hans Christoph Buch’s Monrovia Mon Amour (2002)