Category Archives: heroin withdrawal

Everything you know about heroin addiction is wrong

Heroin, Dalrymple points out,

  • is not highly addictive.
  • Withdrawal from it is not medically serious.
  • Addicts do not become criminals to feed their habit.
  • Addicts do not need any medical assistance to stop taking heroin.

He notes that heroin addiction is

a moral or spiritual problem.

A literary tradition dating back to De Quincey and Coleridge,

and continuing up to the deeply sociopathic William Burroughs and beyond, has misled all Western societies for generations about the nature of heroin addiction. These writers’ self-dramatising and dishonest accounts of their addiction have been accepted uncritically, and have been more influential by far in forming public attitudes than the whole of pharmacological science.

As a result,

a self-serving, self-perpetuating and useless medical bureaucracy has been set up to deal with the problem.

Drug addiction is a condition invented by users and doctors

Screen Shot 2016-07-22 at 09.04.11

Withdrawing from heroin is far from the titanic struggle of misery portrayed by the treatment industry, Dalrymple points out. Treatment for drug addiction is, in fact, a waste of time.

Addiction to opiates is a pretend illness

Screen Shot 2015-12-16 at 09.00.01And, Dalrymple writes,

treatment of it is pretend rather than real treatment.

How and why

addicts came to lie to doctors, how and why doctors came to return the compliment, and how and why society swallowed the lies,

is explored in Romancing Opiates: Pharmacological Lies and the Addiction Bureaucracy, in which Dalrymple explains that

  • heroin is not highly addictive
  • withdrawal from it is not medically serious
  • addicts do not become criminals to feed their habit
  • addicts do not need any medical assistance to stop taking heroin
  • heroin addiction is a moral or spiritual problem.

Withdrawal from opiates is a pretty trivial condition

Screen Shot 2014-06-22 at 12.38.48— certainly by comparison

with illnesses which most of us have experienced, or by comparison with withdrawal from other drugs.

Research has shown, says Dalrymple, that

medical treatment is not necessary for heroin addicts to abandon their habit, and many thousands do so without any medical intervention whatsoever.