Category Archives: ideology

Experiments only somewhat ethically superior to Mengele’s

Josef Mengele

How those who crave ideology seek fulfilment

Dalrymple writes that since the failure of Marxism, one of the strangest of the miscellany of sub-ideologies that have proliferated is that of strident transsexualism. In the space of the past few years,

a full-scale ideological movement has grown up that will not be satisfied until the rest of society accedes to its demands, which include the reform of language. The demands are kaleidoscopic, constantly changing, as the ideology twists in an attempt to overcome its contradictions.

This absurd ideology has

disastrous practical consequences in a society too lacking in moral confidence to oppose it (or any other sufficiently strident ideology).

Dalrymple points out that as a result of the supine acceptance of the ideology,

full-scale experiments are being conducted on children, such as the use of puberty-blocking drugs, by doctors without any clear idea of the long-term outcome — experiments only somewhat ethically superior to those of Dr Mengele, insofar as the children themselves agree to them or even demand them, though at an age at which one would not normally think of children as being able to make such far-reaching choices.

A very small pressure group, an insignificant proportion of the population,

has been able to create an atmosphere or climate in Western societies in which well-meaning, honest, and respectable people, including experts, are unwilling for fear of reprisal to express dissenting views about a matter of considerable symbolic if not numerical importance.

The will to power

seems to have infected people who once might have been content to live quietly, power itself now being the only goal worth aiming for in the absence of anything more elevated or elevating.

Pressure groups of this kind

do not so much seek to persuade us by the force of their arguments as irreversibly to change our mentalities. The freedom that many people desire is the freedom to limit other people’s freedom.

The proliferation of perverted sub-ideologies

A picture of hate: anti-hate-speech protester, Lewes literary festival, November 2017, in Dr (Mme) Dalrymple’s classic photograph

A million monomanias now

The totalitarian impulse, writes Dalrymple,

did not die with the Soviet Union.

Rather, it

fractured into many different monomanias.

The desire for ideology, he points out,

did not die with the failure of Marxism.

On the contrary,

the desire found its fulfillment in a variety of strange sub-ideologies. Future historians will surely find one of the strangest of these to be that of strident transsexualism.

The Islamist ideologues make the Baader-Meinhof Gang look like Aristotle

Dalrymple writes that an ideology, however stupid, is not easy to destroy; believing six impossible things before breakfast is almost par for the course.

Warped values of certain Western Muslims

Screen Shot 2016-08-23 at 08.58.13The young Islamists of western Europe, writes Dalrymple,

  • resent strongly but incoherently
  • blame their conduct on others
  • use their frustrations to justify outrageous and vicious acts
  • pity themselves to the exclusion of all others
  • use their minds as echo chambers for the wrongs, real or imagined, that they have suffered
  • have a grossly inflated sense of their importance
  • have an ideology at hand to make them dangerous on a big scale

The outlook for France is grim

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Église Saint-Étienne

And not just for France, of course. Dalrymple identifies the factors which, he writes,

ensure fertile ground for the recruitment of further Mohammedan ‘martyrs’ for years to come.

These are:

  • a highly secularised Muslim population whose men nevertheless wish to maintain their dominance over women and need a justification for doing so
  • the hurtful experience of disdain or rejection from the surrounding society
  • the bitter disappointment of a frustrated materialism and a seemingly perpetual inferior status in the economic hierarchy
  • the extreme insufficiency and unattractiveness of modern popular culture that is without value
  • the readiness to hand of an ideological and religious solution that is flattering to self-esteem and allegedly all-sufficient, and yet in unavoidable conflict with a large element of each individual’s identity
  • an oscillation between feelings of inferiority and superiority, between humiliation about that which is Western and that which is non-Western in the self
  • the grotesque inflation of the importance of personal existential problems that is typical of modern individualism

The people’s right to illness

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 20.55.35Resistance to the health dictatorship

In Juli Zeh’s Corpus Delicti: Ein Prozess (2009), health as defined by the WHO (‘a state of complete physical, mental and social wellbeing and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’) has, Dalrymple explains,

become the ideology of the state – all other ideologies, religious, social, political and economic, having failed miserably. Citizens are implanted with a chip under their skin; they are obliged, under pain of prosecution, constantly to monitor their blood pressure and biochemical parameters. They are not permitted to stray beyond the limits of areas that have been bacteriologically sanitised, and if they do, they are punished.

The protagonist Mia Holl, a bacteriologist,

Screen Shot 2016-03-31 at 20.58.14is in rebellion against the supposedly beneficent dispensation. A shadowy, and probably fictitious, terrorist organisation is called the PRI (People’s Right to Illness), and she is accused of being a member.

Mia is put on trial for

having consumed illicit substances such as caffeine and tobacco.

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Most ideological of all fields

Screen Shot 2015-12-06 at 18.07.50Pleasure is to be derived, Dalrymple writes, from

reading ingenious commentary that serves no useful purpose. In its uselessness is its joy; for in an ideological age, the exercise of intelligence to no purpose comes as a relief.

Alas, he says, literary criticism,

certainly in its academic form, is now the most ideological of all fields. Most criticism seems to be seen through the lens of class, race or sex: one would hardly be surprised to read a Marxist, racial or feminist critique (dreadful word!) of Daisy Ashford’s The Young Visiters.

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A nasty, primitive ideology

Screen Shot 2015-08-12 at 08.07.19The Islamist cause is mad, stupid and evil

Dalrymple writes that young Western middle-class Muslim plotters, of whom there are many,

are fully at home neither in the culture of their parents nor in that of the host country.

Youth

is the time when one looks outward for unifying explanations of one’s dissatisfactions, and education is in part the means by which abstractions become more real than the phenomena before one’s eyes. An extremely nasty and primitive ideology, in which a distant but perfect future appears to its adherents more real than anything in the present, lies ready to hand. According to this ideology, insensate cruelty is a sign not of bad character or sadism, but of commitment.

Young educated Muslims

think they have plenty of supposedly objective grounds for their resentment against the host society.

In the West, Muslims

do significantly worse educationally and economically than any other group. A larger proportion of Muslims leave school with no qualifications than any other minority. While young Hindus have a youth unemployment rate below the national average, Muslims have a rate much above it. Young male Muslims are filling British prisons, while there are very few Hindus or Sikhs in prison. In these circumstances, the young educated Muslims form an élite that, with the misplaced and arrogant idealism of youth, feels a responsibility to enlighten, lead, or liberate their less fortunate brethren, of whom there are many.

Many young Muslims reject communal self-examination

in favour of conspiracy theories and the exaggeration of supposed grievance, for of course the only defect of Muslim society that believers permit themselves to admit is unjust powerlessness vis-à-vis the unbelievers.

One taboo subject is

the pivotal role of the suppression of women in reinforcing Muslim stagnation. But if you discourage half of your population from seeking education or a career, as occurs in some Muslim populations, it is hardly surprising in a modern economy that educational and economic levels are, in the aggregate, low.

Muslim journalists repeatedly write in Western newspapers that

Muslim anger must be understood and presumably assuaged or appeased: as if Descartes had written, ‘I’m angry, therefore I’m right.’ But rage is not its own justification, and the rage of young men is frequently misplaced. They project outwards what they feel inwards; and, if they have sufficient intellectual sophistication to do so, they give their petty discontents — and the discontents of the would-be bombers are petty — a vast significance. Education gives them the mental dexterity conceptually to transmute concrete evil into abstract good.

The result is often murderous

when un-self-critical and self-pitying anger meets ideology. The compass of the evil done by the uneducated angry is usually small by comparison with that done by the educated (or at least, the technically trained) angry. The worst the uneducated can manage is a mob and a riot. It takes education, or training, in close alliance with resentment, to put evil more extensively into practice.

The appeal of Islam

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Richard Dart, a Muslim convert, plotted to attack soldiers

Hormonally disaffected young Western men are drawn to it

With the USSR’s downfall, Dalrymple writes, Marxism lost most of its allure for these youths,

leaving them bereft of significance and purpose. Except for one group among them, they now had only a potpourri of causes (sexism, racism, the environment, etc.), none of which quite met the need or filled the gap. The group excepted, of course, was the Muslims. Islam was waiting in the wings with a ready-made ideology. Nature hates a vacuum, especially in young men’s heads, which are all too easily filled with quarter-baked ideas.

Youth, after all,

is the age not of idealism but of self-importance, uncertainty masked by certitude and moral grandiosity untouched by experience of life — or, of course, the age of total insouciance. It is not surprising that ideology makes young men dangerous, for it is in the nature of ideology to answer all the difficult questions of human existence while giving believers the illusion of special understanding and destiny not available to others.

Sentimentality, poisoner of British life

Screen Shot 2013-03-28 at 00.20.25No group of people is more sentimental, argues Dalrymple, than the corrupt and cock-eyed British intelligentsia,

at the root of most of whose ideologies is a sentimental disregard of the most obvious realities, in favour of absurdities they would prefer to be true.