Category Archives: imperialism

The European project is inherently imperialistic

It necessitates, Dalrymple writes,

the suppression of nationhood in Europe against the express wishes or even capacity of the vast majority of Europeans.

Moreover,

there is no logical reason why the European Union should stop at Europe’s (rather indistinct) borders — rather the reverse. That the Union should be European implies that there is a border between the European and the non-European, but the pan-Europeans are against borders. The elimination of borders is the official raison d’être of the project; borders are supposed to be the cause of wars.

Dalrymple points out that the European constructivists are Kantians, followers of one

whose scheme of universal peace ought to appear laughably shallow to anyone who has seen more of the world than is visible from a regular walk on the same route day after day through 18th-century Königsberg.

Liberal supranationalism is dangerously dictatorial

Dalrymple notes that José Manuel Barroso, while head of the European Commission, on one occasion

let fall the true nature of the European Union. It was, he said, an empire, albeit an empire of an entirely new type. He said that for the first time in history nations had agreed to pool their sovereignty.

To what end, Barroso did not say.

Proconsuls of the Apocalypse

Supposed humanitarian aid has, writes Dalrymple,

hitherto been auto-legitimating, and has always relied on donors mistaking the wish for the fact.

NGOs, he points out, are

arrogant and behave with a kind of imperial impunity in the impoverished countries in which they operate. It is the imperial or proconsular nature of the organisations and their work that appeals to the ‘humanitarians’ that they employ. It is the power in the power to do good, or confer benefits, that attracts them.

Grit of the Scotchmen

William Jardine. Dalrymple points out that Scots were among the most ardent of imperialists

The global health agenda

It is, writes Dalrymple,

an imperialism of good intentions, with its associated international bureaucracy (usually remunerated in Swiss francs).

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Involuntary headscarf adoption

Screen Shot 2016-03-07 at 09.01.24In some giant Western housing projects, writes Dalrymple,

young Muslim women who dress in Western clothing are deemed to be fair game, inviting—indeed, asking for—rape by gangs of Muslim youths. In such circumstances, it is impossible to know whether the adoption of Islamic dress by women in Western society is ever truly voluntary, and so long as such behaviour persists, the presumption must be against its being so.

Islamic extremists

use secularism to impose theocracy: a tactic that calls to mind that of the communists of old, who appealed to freedom of speech with the long-term aim of extinguishing it. As Moscow financed the communists, the Saudis finance many of the Muslim extremists.

Muslim women can be seen on the streets of Western cities

so completely covered that even their eyes are hardly visible through the slit in their headdress.

The women who appear in such costume

are often subject to forced marriage, and no one can tell whether they wear Islamic costume from choice or through brute intimidation.

Moreover,

they are members of a religion with a strong aggressive, proselytising, and imperialistic streak—a religion that ultimately recognises nothing but itself, not even the secular state, as a source of authority.

The wounded amour propre of subject peoples

Screen Shot 2015-08-30 at 08.56.33Many people, writes Dalrymple,

would rather be misruled by their own than well governed by strangers.

The greatest harm inflicted by colonial régimes, he argues,

was to the pride of the colonised. It was not the larger injustices that moved them (it seldom is), but the disdain and contempt in which they were so obviously held by the colonisers. Unrequited admiration is bad enough, but to admire those who regard you as beneath consideration, and as congenitally stupid and lacking in capacity, is painful indeed.