Category Archives: import of labour

Europe cursed by welfarism

Screenshot 2020-01-25 at 16.31.12It is not demography that makes demographic renewal necessary in Europe, it is social security

It is often said that Europe has need of demographic renewal, so low is its birth rate. Dalrymple points out that this argument is

false, or intended to disguise something very discreditable.

The rate of youth unemployment in European countries with a total population of more than 150m is 20-25%, meaning there is a considerable reserve army of labour.

It should surely be easier for a young Spaniard, Greek, or Frenchman to integrate into German society than for someone from the Middle East or Africa. But the young Europeans, especially those without qualifications, are not desperate for work because, thanks to state allocations, they can get by without, and would hardly be better off if they did move to where there is work.

Countries with full employment need to import labour,

but cannot do so from other countries in Europe because that labour would require much higher wages to give them an incentive to seek work, higher wages than their labour was worth. In these circumstances, migrants are a necessary source of cheap labour, irrespective of whatever other advantages or—more likely—disadvantages they might bring.

Screenshot 2020-01-25 at 16.15.17

Youth unemployment in EU member states

Hauteur and haughtiness at the Guardian

Leafing through a copy of the London newspaper the Guardian, Dalrymple comes across the following sentence written by a woman called Bunting:

When a girl at 17 decides to go ahead and have a baby, there is no tragedy of lost opportunity other than the local checkout till waiting for her low-paid labour.

Dalrymple comments:

This sentence breathes snobbery and disdain for those who actually do such work; it assumes, moreover, that once a supermarket checkout cashier, always a supermarket checkout cashier, a fate worse than death. That there might actually be people for whom such work is suitable, and potentially not odious, does not occur to the writer.

What makes the work odious, Dalrymple points out,

is not the work itself, but those who communicate their disdain of it.

Thus snobbery, of the kind expressed by the Guardian,

makes the import of labour necessary.

Madeleine Bunting