Category Archives: impunity

What the jeune-de-banlieue wants

Screen Shot 2016-01-01 at 21.53.30He desires, writes Dalrymple,

a good time.

Bakunin’s aphorism about the destructive urge being a constructive one

would have been nearer the mark if he had mentioned that it was, above all, a highly enjoyable one.

Destruction

is fun; but to destroy in the name of a supposed cause, that is bliss. Impunity helps, of course.

Insofar as the jeune-de-banlieue

has a discernible if unexpressed demand, it is for extraterritorial status. He wants to be left alone. He does not want the State to interfere in his affairs — theft, drug-dealing, the abuse of women — in any way.

When you get out, I’m fucking coming to fucking get you, you cunt

Screen Shot 2015-09-11 at 09.02.47So said a man,

whose physiognomy and deportment proclaimed him a member of the criminal classes,

sitting next to Dalrymple in court. The man made the threat — perfectly audible to the people in the court — to the accused who was entering the dock (protected by bulletproof glass).

He repeated the threat several times, and stared menacingly at the accused. The accused, who was mentally subnormal, turned away in fright.

Although it was not necessary, since everyone had heard what the man next to him had said, Dalrymple drew the attention of court officials to his threatening activities.

The officials did nothing, apart from the court clerk telling the man to desist, which he did—but only when, a little later, the judge entered. I subsequently became the object of his menacing regard.

That he had committed a crime

in the very heart of the criminal justice system, in front of many credible witnesses who could testify against him, and that no punishment followed, emblematised the paralysis into which not just the criminal justice system but the entire public administration of Britain has fallen. Outside the courtroom door, police patrolled with submachine guns directed at a notional threat; inside, a man committed a common crime with impunity. It was almost as if the policemen were protecting him rather than the law-abiding public.

It is easy to imagine, writes Dalrymple, the emboldening effect of the man’s court experience.

What fear need he have of a system too feeble even to demand obedience within its supposedly hallowed portals? I, on the other hand, had to look around as I left the court, in case he should be loitering with intent. Only the peaceful and law-abiding fear the law in Britain today.

Notes from underground

Screen Shot 2014-01-21 at 13.23.08On an escalator on the Metro, Dalrymple witnessed this scene:

A young man in international slum-costume and face as malign as the late Mark Duggan’s…used a spray gun to scrawl his initials in bright red on the handrail. Scores of people saw him do it….He returned the other way to repeat his action on another handrail.

Dalrymple was saddened.

The ease with which the stupid and criminal insolence of one young man was able to defeat the civilised conduct of the vast majority of citizens present was…dispiriting.

Duggan: malign

Duggan: malign

And just because the young man was cretinous

doesn’t mean he wasn’t cunning, or wouldn’t be able to draw the correct lesson that he could act with…impunity.

Dalrymple dared not do anything to stop the French Duggan. Nor did anyone else. Why? Dalrymple points to these factors:

  • He and others were ‘busy with their own lives’
  • He and others were afraid of the French Duggan, ‘that he might carry a knife or a gun’
  • He and others were ‘by no means confident that if they had intervened…it would be the young man and not they who would be charged with an offence’
  • Certain witnesses — admittedly a very few, the silliest among them — might have ‘so read, marked and inwardly digested the exculpatory sociology of our time that they saw in his graffito not an act of moral depravity but a cry for help’

Britain today: impunity of the thugs

Screen Shot 2014-01-11 at 21.21.19If you allow people to behave badly, writes Dalrymple,

bad behaviour is what you’ll get; indeed, general standards of conduct will decline, even among those who were formerly well behaved. The worst people will, with their natural cunning, draw the conclusion that they can conduct themselves with impunity.