Category Archives: intellectual nullity

Who becomes a communist?

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 23.07.53What sort of American or Western European is drawn to such depravity and horror?

By about 1936, writes Dalrymple, communism in Russia had brought

  • two massive famines causing the deaths of millions
  • routinely more executions in a day than Tsarism performed in a century (and this from the very first moment of Bolshevik power)
  • the establishment of vast forced labour camps in which hundreds of thousands had already died
  • the utter decimation of intellectual life
Alger Hiss Alger Hiss

It is, he points out,

a myth that none of this was known or knowable at the time: on the contrary, it was all perfectly well known, if widely ignored.

What sort of moral idiot embraced communist dogmas? It is intrinsically unlikely, Dalrymple points out,

that a man espouses a totalitarian doctrine of proved and indisputable viciousness and violence from a love of peace and a dislike of poverty.

Kim Philby and George Blake Kim Philby and George Blake

Attention is often drawn to the economic and political context in which Western European and American communists and fellow travellers operated, suggesting that in the context,

any generous-minded and generous-hearted man concerned about the fate of the world might have made the same decision.

J. Robert Oppenheimer J. Robert Oppenheimer

This, says Dalrymple, is false. Communists in the West swallowed many things without any of them impinging on them in the slightest, such as, to name but a few:

  • the famines
  • the show trials
  • the Gulag
  • the Great Terror
  • the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact
  • the ludicrous cult of Stalin’s personality
  • the removal of entire populations
  • the Doctor’s Plot
  • the show trials in Czechoslovakia, Romania and elsewhere in Eastern Europe
  • the Berlin and Hungarian uprisings

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 23.22.24The fact is, says Dalrymple, that those who became communists were attracted by precisely those aspects of communism that would repel most decent people, namely,

  • its violence and ruthlessness
  • its suppression of all views inimical to it
  • its cruel wholesale restructuring of society according to the crude and gimcrack ideas of arrogant, ambitious but profoundly mediocre intellectuals

Screen Shot 2015-04-13 at 23.33.05What many communist utopians dreamed of was

  • mass murder
  • deportations
  • suppression of people who differed from them
  • complete control over the lives of everyone

New-look Little Mermaid (warning: satanic content)

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 20.02.51Dalrymple chuckles at the cartoon pictured right, which is from Le Canard enchaîné. He notes that the verb relouquer

brings to mind reluquer, which means to ogle — doubtless a play on words.

He also likes the ‘Mahomet overwhelmed by the fundamentalists’ cover of Charlie Hebdo (‘It’s hard sometimes, being loved by these cretins’).

From the outset of the Danish cartoons crisis, Dalrymple points out, the French

have vigorously defended the right of free expression, unlike the British and Americans, whose pretence that they ‘understand’ Muslim outrage has fooled no one and given the fanatics the (correct) impression of weakness and lack of conviction — and thus encouraged them.

Le Canard enchaîné and Charlie Hebdo have

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 19.44.37with Voltairean aplomb published a series of cartoons mocking the Islamists and their beliefs as they deserve, with a courage and frankness almost entirely missing from the British and American media. They have inflicted a humiliation on the Islamists, in the best possible way, by exposing their intellectual nullity to withering scorn.

Moreover,

no one can accuse the two papers of racism, xenophobia, or any of the other crimes of lèse-PC, since they criticise and mock everyone (who deserves it) without fear or favour.

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 20.40.44The French emerge

as far stauncher and more fearless and unapologetic defenders of freedom than the Americans or the British. They have stuck to an important principle without calculation of immediate interest or even short-term consequences.

The French

find the equivocations of the Anglo-Saxons strange, spineless, and reprehensible, and in this instance they are absolutely right.

(2006)

Screen Shot 2015-02-14 at 20.39.47