Category Archives: junk food

Not all Siamese are elegantly slender

img_3041Passing through Bangkok, Dalrymple is provided with an illustration of the connection between junk food and obesity.

I watched children emerge from an exclusive school, and they grazed on huge quantities of junk food the moment they were free to do so. Not surprisingly, they were fat, startlingly so in a land where most people are elegantly slender.

The wages of sin — gluttony

Dalrymple is delighted to read in a paper published in a medical journal that those who consume disgusting sweet fatty mass-produced muck

are more likely than others to develop type 2 diabetes—the type that is increasing throughout the world at an alarming pace, and in some countries threatening to reverse the increase in life expectancy to which we have grown accustomed as part of the natural order of things and now think of almost as a human right.

Such diabetes, he writes,

is not only the wages of sin—gluttony—but of something that affects our everyday lives even worse, namely mass bad taste.

Dead meat

Dalrymple on Meals to Die For by the Texas death-row cook Brian D. Price: 'A few years ago...in the bookshop in the airport nearest my English home, I found a volume devoted to the last meals requested by men about to be executed in Texas....To my lasting regret I did not buy the book and have not found it since. It was both horrifying and fascinating....what really horrified me were not the crimes of the condemned men but their choices of a last meal...they all wanted to go out on a full stomach of junk food and industrially produced sweet drinks. Whether the Texas Department of Corrections would have stood for more sophisticated tastes I don’t know: Bélon oysters, for example, and a glass of fine Chablis....My horror at their choices was not quite as frivolous as might at first appear, for junk food is criminogenic.'

Dalrymple on death-row cook Brian D. Price’s Meals to Die For: ‘A few years ago…in the bookshop in the airport nearest my English home [Birmingham Airport], I found a volume devoted to the last meals requested by men about to be executed in Texas….To my lasting regret I did not buy the book and have not found it since. It was both horrifying and fascinating….what really horrified me were not the crimes of the condemned men but their choices of a last meal…they all wanted to go out on a full stomach of junk food and industrially produced sweet drinks. Whether the Texas Department of Corrections would have stood for more sophisticated tastes I don’t know: Bélon oysters, for example, and a glass of fine Chablis.’