Category Archives: Lenin

Corbyn the anti-Semite

The Enemy of Humanity Kalen Ockerman 2018. Mural in Hanbury Street, Spitalfields

Dalrymple reports that Jeremy Corbyn, leader of Britain’s far-Left-populist opposition party, recently mounted a defence of a mural depicting Jewish bankers playing Monopoly on the backs of naked minorities. Corbyn wrote:

Why? You are in good company. Rockerfeller [sic] destroyed Diego Viera’s [sic] mural because it includes a picture of Lenin.

Dalrymple points out that this sort of thing is

cause for anxiety among British Jews unknown since the rise — and thankfully swift fall — of Sir Oswald Mosley.

The analphabetic Leader of the Opposition

Nelson Rockefeller and Diego Rivera

Diego Viera

Vladimir Lenin

Sir Oswald Mosley and friend

Roderick Spode (Lord Sidcup)

Man at the Crossroads Mural at the Rockefeller Center. Diego Rivera, 1933. Destroyed 1934

American Progress Josep Maria Sert, 1937 — the mural that replaced Rivera’s at the Rockefeller Center

The explicit is the enemy of the voluptuous

Orgies — you’ve seen one, you’ve seen ’em all

Dalrymple notes that an orgy scene is now mandatory in opera productions,

just as doctoral theses in the Soviet Union used to need at least one quotation from Lenin.

Viewing the compulsory orgy scene in a production of Rigoletto (Giuseppe Verdi; first performed 1861), Dalrymple observes that orgies these days

are staged literally rather than suggestively.

It is as if, he says,

the ageing audience has to be reminded of what sex is.

Moreover, he points out, they are done up

like a tableau of Richard von Krafft-Ebing’s Psychopathia Sexualis [1886].

Richard von Krafft-Ebing, author of the dirtiest book ever written

‘Der unerwartet große buchhändlerische Erfolg ist wohl der beste Beweis dafür, daß es auch Der unzählige Unglückliche gibt, die in dem sonst nur Männern der Wissenschaft gewidmeten Buche Aufklärung und Trost hinsichtlich rätselhafter Erscheinungen ihrer eigenen Vita sexualis suchen und finden.’

Pitiless monster

Had it not been, writes Dalrymple,

for the cataclysmic First World War, Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov would have remained as he should have remained: an obscure, exiled scribbler of dull, intolerant, and hate-filled political pamphlets, with no chance to put his fathomless misanthropy into practice.

He adds:

No man was ever more a stranger to pity.