Category Archives: Mandate of Heaven

An advanced East and a backward West

China flu and the ignominy of Europe

Anyone who has been to church in France, writes Dalrymple,

will have noticed that the direction of the tide of evangelism has reversed. It used to be from France to Africa; now it is from Africa to France. Many of the priests are African: they come to serve or convert the heathen who once colonised them.

It points, he notes,

to a loss, not only of faith but of cultural confidence. The idea of Europe preaching to the world now seems ridiculous. Europe has lost the mandate of heaven.

Who would have thought, Dalrymple asks,

even 30 years ago, that China would be sending humanitarian assistance to Italy, both in the form of medical material and technicians?

There has been a reversal

of what people in the West, for so long, took as the natural order of things.

The Wuhan virus

has revealed what Westerners would have preferred not to know: they are no longer in the forefront.

Dalrymple points out that Europe cannot even console itself that, if it has not responded with the efficiency of Korea, Taiwan, or Singapore, it is at least not authoritarian. Near where Dalrymple lives, people are required to show a laissez-passer. Taking a short walk in the district, Dalrymple says he half-expects someone to jump out of a doorway and shout

Halt! Ihre Papiere, bitte.

A Chinese aid worker loads humanitarian relief supplies bound for Italy at Hangzhou airport

Nice to the nasty, nasty to the nice

The emasculated British police

England, writes Dalrymple, has rapidly descended

from being one of the best ordered societies in the western world to being among the worst.

He notes that in A Brief History of Crime, Peter Hitchens places the blame

firmly where it belongs, on a supine and pusillanimous political establishment that, for four decades at least, has constantly retreated before the verbal onslaught of liberal intellectuals whose weapons have been mockery allied to sentimental guilt about their prosperous and comfortable lives, and whose aim has been to liberate themselves from personally irksome moral constraints, without regard to the consequences for those less favourably placed in society than themselves.

It was, Dalrymple points out, the intellectual élite which demanded

that the law’s teeth be drawn, that perpetrators be treated as the victims of their own behaviour.

Why, he asks, has the British political establishment proved so craven over the years? It has, he suggests, something to do

with the loss of empire and world power — what the Chinese call the loss of the Mandate of Heaven.