Category Archives: nausea

Uriah Heep meets Ayn Rand

The triumph of self-esteem over self-respect

Dalrymple writes that one of the worst and most unpleasant of human qualities is self-esteem.

He comes across, in a British newspaper (legacy-media journalism in the West has suffered a precipitous decline in quality in the last three decades), some unctuous drivel about ‘kindfulness‘. He likens such bunk to an overdose of the disgusting sweetened drink known as cherry cola. It nauseates him with its invitation to preen and to tell oneself that one is, despite everything, a good person.

Caterwauling from across the pond about Trump

Commenting on Dalrymple’s ambivalent attitude towards Donald Trump, a reader writes:

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screen-shot-2017-02-12-at-11-20-38But when we go north of the border, Dalrymple equivocates not at all. Justin Trudeau, he says, is a man born to Original Virtue, and just to look at pictures of his face, which radiates self-proclaimed goodness and Leftist smugness, is to experience disgust — the sensation you get when you’ve had too many marrons glacés: mild nausea accompanied by a general feeling of stickiness.

Maar het is niet president Duterte waar ik de grootste afkeuring voor heb op het wereldtoneel, zoals het in feite zou horen. Nee, het is iemand die in mijn ogen vele malen hatelijker is, namelijk Justin Trudeau (of moet ik zeggen Sint Justin Trudeau?), de premier van Canada. Ik moet al walgen enkel van naar foto’s te kijken van zijn ongelofelijk zelfvoldaan gezicht, dat straalt van de zelfverklaarde goedheid. Een goedheid die in schril contrast staat met de rest van de menselijkheid, zeker ten zuiden van de Canadese grens. Het veroorzaakt dezelfde sensatie als het eten van te veel marrons glacés: lichte misselijkheid vergezeld van een algemeen plakkerig gevoel.

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Brown was never as detestable as Blair

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Incompetence is less appalling than evil

Gordon Brown, writes Dalrymple,

may have been a flawed, even a very flawed, human being, but he was at least recognisably human.
And Brown had one quality
that moved me, and in my opinion lent him great dignity: he never made political capital of, or sought public sympathy for, his personal handicap. You have only to imagine what Blair might have made of such a handicap to understand the significance of that quality. Indeed the mind turns away from the very thought of it. I am a very poor sailor and can make myself queasy at the thought of a boat, but the very idea of Mr Blair talking of his injury and handicap gives me full-blown nausea.

The uses of intoxicants

An evidently stupefied Aldous Huxley in early 1938

An evidently LSD-stupefied Aldous Huxley in early 1938

Admirably level-headed on this as on so many other matters, Dalrymple writes that it seems cannabis

can relieve nausea (one of the most unpleasant of all symptoms when it is persistent) and some kinds of pain. Its side effects in this context are unlikely to be serious or severe.

This is undeniable. However, we should not go further than this. The claims that are sometimes made, by for example Aldous Huxley, that such intoxicants (Huxley’s own favourite was LSD) can transport us to higher regions of consciousness and deepen our awareness are just a little foolish. To smoke marihuana in moderation is nothing more than a civilised pleasure, as is consuming the better beers or decent gin. It will not cause us to levitate, attain enlightenment or touch God.