Category Archives: paranoia

Pronunciamento of the philosopher-shrinks

Screenshot 2020-02-05 at 08.23.27An attempt to invalidate the political opinions and choices of opponents on spurious, potentially dictatorial, psychiatric grounds

Dalrymple points out that the assertion by a group of psychiatrists that Donald Trump is unfit psychiatrically to be president of the USA is

absurd and unethical.

It is

political prejudice masquerading as medical diagnosis and prognosis.

The psychiatrists

presumably take comfort in the unanimity of their opinion, as did the 100 German physicists who denounced relativity theory because Einstein was Jewish. If they had been right, said Einstein, one would have been enough.

Regarding the president’s paranoid style of thought, Dalrymple notes that

if Mr Trump did not believe that there were plots against him, if he were convinced that there were not, this would be delusional. For him blandly to say that he had no enemies in Congress, and that no members of Congress were meeting together to plan his downfall, would be a sign of madness, a loss of grasp of the most obvious reality.

The quack psychiatrists

must have a very unflattering view of the United States and its system of government—something like an electoral tinpot dictatorship—if they suppose that the fate of the country, indeed the world, rests upon the mental state of one man.

It seems, says Dalrymple, that they

would prefer the rule of philosopher-psychiatrists to that of people with psychiatric pathology (the vast majority of the population, if the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is to be believed).

The philosopher-shrinks believe in

a version of the basket-of-deplorables hypothesis. People who voted for or supported the president did not have a different opinion, they had an illness. Mr Trump is incapable for medical reasons of making a rational choice, and this applies to millions, tens of millions, of Americans.

Dalrymple points out that psychiatry

is not an exact science, and much of it—psychoanalysis, for example—is not a science at all. To leave the State to the discretion of psychiatrists is like leaving industrial policy to alchemists or public health policy to astrologers.

Educated voters for, and supporters of, Trump

are well aware of his character defects, which require no very great psychological acuity to descry, but prefer him to the alternatives for political and economic reasons.

When Moslems go out of their tiny little minds

Even those, writes Dalrymple,

who are not psychiatrically disturbed may have an outlook on life of a distinctly paranoid flavour. When Moslem believers go mad, their madness often has a religio-paranoid content.

A paranoid-schizophrenic African dictator

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 08.54.18The worst dictatorships, writes Dalrymple,

try to destroy not only people but memory itself.

Among the worst dictatorships in a century full of dictatorships

was that of Ahmed Sékou Touré, president of the West African state of Guinea for more than a quarter of the 20th century. A third of a population fled his rule, and many thousands were tortured and killed, victims of the dictator’s paranoia.

Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 08.59.23Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 09.02.40Screen Shot 2016-08-24 at 09.00.00

What they’re hiding about EgyptAir 804

Screen Shot 2016-05-28 at 15.46.44An electronic pulse, the UK legal system and a cabal of airlines

Browsing the internet, Dalrymple comes across some analysis of the EgyptAir Flight 804 crash affair that has

a degree of certainty

Screen Shot 2016-05-28 at 15.51.39suggesting

contacts in high places.

Headed

EgyptAir 804 Shot Down with Electronic Pulse – Intel Report – 5-19-16,

the summary of the exposition (the full theory is set out in the YouTube video) reads:

Mossad did it

Mossad did it

Stew Webb and Tom Heneghan go over the latest Intel from US and French Intel concerning the EgyptAir 804 crash. They have been told by French Intel it was taken down with an Electronic Pulse weapon and Israel did it. Only Israel and the US have this type of weapon. A French satellite picked up the shoot down. Please visit and share the hardcore truth on http://www.stewwebb.com censored by all controlled opposition in alternative media.

Imagine, says Dalrymple,

trying to discuss the matter with the author of this opinion. Before long you would have entered a mental labyrinth from which there was no exit. Any evidence you adduced would be discounted as having been manufactured by the very conspirators who brought the aëroplane down. His conclusion would be irrefutable: the very attempt to refute it would prove to him just how far the conspirators had succeeded in covering their tracks.

UK legal system: encourages and motivates terrorism through its nonsensical procedures and judgments

UK legal system: to blame for the bringing down of Egyptair Flight 804 because of the way it encourages and motivates terrorism worldwide through its nonsensical procedures and judgments

Another observer says:

We can blame the nonsense UK legal system for encouraging and motivate terrorism.

Dalrymple comments:

One imagines that the evidently enraged writer had had some slight legal problem in Britain and that he did not fully understand the arcane process by which it was resolved, probably not in his favour. Be that as it may, it is not easy to see why or how deficiencies of the law in Britain (I leave aside the fact that Scottish law is different from English) should have encouraged or motivated someone to blow up an aëroplane going from Paris to Cairo.

A third critic remarks:

It is up to the authorities to get this sorted out, it seems to me they are turning a blind eye to it. After all this is not the first time. Corruption and back-handers come to mind.

Dalrymple comments:

The best interpretation that I can give to the above is that the security authorities at the Paris airport (at all airports?) have been bribed consistently not to do their work properly. By whom they have been bribed the author does not venture: perhaps by the terrorists, perhaps by the cartel or cabal of airlines who do not wish their passengers to be further inconvenienced by security measures, about which they already grumble. On the other hand, of course, terrorism can hardly be good for the airline business.

Such commentators, writes Dalrymple, feel that

they have understood what others have not, that they have penetrated an essence of events that less astute or well-informed persons have not been able to divine. If you listen to any conversation in any bar of any provincial town, you will soon realise that almost everyone involved in it is party to the inner workings of the world, though by day they are all minor functionaries in businesses or organisations whose headquarters are elsewhere.

Screen Shot 2016-05-28 at 15.59.38

Cabal of airlines: intel report confirms payment of large bribes to security authorities at Charles de Gaulle and many other airports

Cabal of airlines: intel report confirms payment of large bribes to security authorities at Charles de Gaulle and many other airports

Hoxha dead? Wait, it could be a trap

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.09.00

First Secretary of the Party of Labour of Albania, 1985-91

Dalrymple says of his time in Albania during the days of Ramiz Alia that the Enver Hoxha personality cult

persisted, as if nobody could be sure that Hoxha was really dead and feared he might return, his purported death being a ruse to uncover those who worshipped him only through fear and not because they loved him in their hearts.

Dalrymple explains that in the Republika Popullore Socialiste e Shqipërisë,

  • the tops of the posts in the vineyards were provided with metal spikes to impale invading parachutists
  • there was one concrete gun emplacement for every four inhabitants
  • by night searchlights scoured the coast for traitors trying to flee compulsory happiness

The official policy of the country

was paranoia; it was its religion.

Gun emplacements in defence of prosperity

Pillboxes in defence of prosperity

Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.01.34Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.06.59Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.08.21Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.07.54 Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.08.09 Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.07.43 Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 08.07.33Screen Shot 2016-05-22 at 07.52.11

The case of Vester Lee Flanagan

Screen Shot 2015-09-12 at 11.07.59Dalrymple identifies three principal features: bitter paranoia, craving for celebrity, and self-righteous anger.

1. The paranoid stance

The belief, writes Dalrymple, is that

the world is so constituted as to do one down.

This has

sour compensations, chief among which is that it explains in advance all our possible failures. We fail, but never deserve to do so. We are absolved from even trying to succeed, since the forces arrayed against us are too strong; bitterness therefore increases in proportion to the alleged, or self-described, meritocracy of a society.

The advance of sociology

has given us a menu of impersonal forces from which to choose to explain away our failings and discontents. It is co-opted to become the omnium gatherum of self-exculpation.

There is grandiosity,

in so far as the paranoid person believes that much that goes on around him is directed at himself.

There have always been people of paranoid disposition, Dalrymple points out, and he cites the Azande of the Sudan, who used to believe that no one died except by the witchcraft of enemies,

Azande sorcerer

Azande sorcerer

so that it is hardly surprising that they developed a wary attitude to their neighbours and the people around them.

Where there is a cultural emphasis on racism,

an increased number of people, with a relatively high propensity as individuals to paranoia, will interpret the world in its light.

2. The apparent desire for fame

Flanagan appears to have felt an inner compulsion to be famous. Dalrymple comments:

Provided the fame sought is for valuable achievement which is a precondition of becoming famous, the desire is constructive and perhaps even necessary. But where fame is desired for its own sake, detached from any worthwhile achievement, it is malignant and loosens or dissolves moral restraint on behaviour.

Worthwhile achievement is as difficult as ever, but

self-publicity is increasingly commonplace and fame the desire of more and more people who would once have been contented with obscurity. Those with an extreme desire for fame — unaccompanied by any particular qualification for it — resort to ever more bizarre behaviour in order to reach it.

3. The claimed sense of moral outrage

Dalrymple writes that we do not think of anger as a sin any longer

but as the sign of a generous heart, at least when felt and expressed on behalf of others. To live your life without anger is to be complacent and self-satisfied. Since the state of the world gives plenty of scope for those seeking an occasion for anger, we may be angry on behalf of others all the time. The greater our anger, the greater our generosity of spirit. Since our anger is noble and generous, when we act out of such anger, we suppose that we are acting generously.

Anger

makes us love injustice, provided that it is we who are committing it. An atmosphere of rage is concomitantly one of self-righteous cruelty.

Hypochondriasis viewed as a religio-philosophical problem

Dalrymple writes that the obsession with

health, safety and security (which have replaced faith, hope and charity as virtues) is not proportional, except possibly inversely, to risk or threat.

The hypochondriac

is not assuaged by statistics that show that his generation is the healthiest that has ever lived, or that death does not lurk in every food and every product and every situation. In the absence of a transcendent purpose in life, staving off death becomes all-important.

Le Malade imaginaire. Honoré Daumier, c. 1860-62. Philadelphia Museum of Art

Le Malade imaginaire. Honoré Daumier, c. 1860-62. Philadelphia Museum of Art

The economics and politics of Venezuela

Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 22.14.00Few countries, writes Dalrymple, are so impervious to experience as Venezuela, which has the world’s largest proved oil reserves (source: US Energy Information Administration, 2013 ranking).
This gift of God has been turned into a curse; for whenever the price of oil goes up, the government distributes largesse by means of subsidy to the populace (though not, of course, without considerable defalcation or malversation on its own part).
Screen Shot 2015-02-25 at 22.16.52Whenever the price of oil goes down,
the subsidies have to be withdrawn, either by means of price rises or general shortage. Either method results in discontent, conflict and a political crisis; and then scapegoats have to be found by whoever is in power. The Venezuelan pendulum swings between hubris and paranoia.

!!! stop! the illegal!! film project campaign!!

Edward Hopper, Morning Sun (1952). Columbus Museum of Art

Edward Hopper, Morning Sun (1952). Columbus Museum of Art

is there and all not what appears do you know what you have been participating intoxicating mix TV stardom fantasy intrigue competitions offers financial incentives commercial benefits re-scheduling reorganising overtaking of everyones lives for purposes of the film set and cause of supposed secret charity business encouraged people to relinquish autonomy disarmed and suspended their own judgment intellect reason are you thinking for yourself are you being told what to do do you receive other information about what is going on other than from the Machine itself is it accurate information is it a marketing game are you being manipulated by incentives to take part in something that is for your benefit or is it really more for the benefit of the owners of a huge business machine that you are funding for the

The degeneracy and paranoid egotism of the young people of Britain

Screen Shot 2013-04-21 at 16.25.27

Fuck off!

Dalrymple notes that young Englishmen (the term, with its innocent Jerome K. Jerome Edwardian flavour, has become sadly comic)

take the mildest unfavourable comment on their conduct as a vicious assault, and become aggressive. Freedom is a matter of doing what they want, without anyone — customers, employers, whoever it might be —  telling them otherwise.

Young Britons, in their delinquency and degradation, have become incapable of recognising that

different ways of speaking and modes of address are appropriate to different situations. Their social outlook is crude; any difference in levels of formality would represent at best hypocrisy and at worst oppressive inequality. The distinction between friendliness and overfamiliarity is lost, rendering interaction shallow and vulgar. Here is a world of no degrees and absence of refinement.

The result for people attempting to run a service-oriented company — or practically any other business, small or large — is this: such companies just

will not employ young Britons,

however loud the exhortations of corrupt politicians hoping to subcontract to struggling, honest businesses their wrong-headed and repulsive work of social engineering.

Better a single Romanian, Ghanaian, Colombian, Bangladeshi or Vietnamese employee — of whatever age, but the older the better — than a thousand young Britons.