Category Archives: Partido Comunista del Perú

Dalrymple given the brush-off by Amnesty apparatchik

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Abimael Guzmán and Mao Zedong

On the way back to Europe from Peru, Dalrymple falls into conversation with the person seated next to him on the aëroplane, who turns out to be an investigator for Amnesty International, the human rights NGO. When Dalrymple tells the investigator about the things he has seen done by the Peruvian army, the investigator

looked like a man who had just been fed with a tantalisingly delicious dish, or a cat at the cream; it was, it seemed to me, exactly what he wanted to hear. He almost purred.

But when Dalrymple tells the investigator about the things he has seen done by the Communist Party of Peru (the Maoist guerrillas Sendero Luminoso or Shining Path), the investigator’s

'He turned away from me and took no further interest in my conversation'

‘He turned away from me and took no further interest in my conversation’

expression turned sour and he looked at me as if I were a credulous bearer of tales about unicorns or sea monsters. He turned away from me and took no further interest in my conversation.

Dalrymple points out that

constituted governments do a lot of evil, but they are not the only ones to do evil.

In the case of the insurgency in Peru,

the government was the lesser evil, and by far.

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Murderousness of Leftist intellectuals

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 18.27.37Latin America guerrilla movements, writes Dalrymple,

far from being the spontaneous and justified expression of a downtrodden peasantry, as was the received wisdom among Western intellectuals, were the products of rapidly expanding numbers of university students led by Leftist intellectuals.

Screen Shot 2013-12-18 at 18.30.21For instance,

the Guatemalan guerrilla group, ORPA, was led by the son of the Guatemalan Nobel prize winner, the novelist Miguel Ángel Asturias. The worst of them, Peru’s Sendero Luminoso, was led by a professor of philosophy, Abimael Guzmán, who very nearly became Peru’s Pol Pot.