Category Archives: police

Chauvin and the three others ought to be tried according to law

George Floyd, Dalrymple writes,

was killed by a policeman behaving in a brutal fashion, and it is very difficult to think of extenuating circumstances for that officer’s conduct. Even had Floyd not been altogether angelic, it is part of a policeman’s duty to deal with awkward customers without killing them in brutal and even sadistic fashion.

Even worse, from the social point of view, was that Officer Derek Chauvin

was watched by three of his colleagues who did nothing to intervene. This suggests, at least prima facie, that there is something deeper wrong with the Minneapolis police force than individual rogue behaviour (though it wouldn’t surprise me if it emerged that Chauvin was a bully to his colleagues as well as to the public, and that they were afraid of him).

To establish any such general fault with the Minneapolis police department with reasonable certainty, however,

would require a genuinely independent and impartial inquiry, if such an inquiry could now ever be held.

Whited sepulchres: England’s no-good cops

Then: deliberately unthreatening uniform

Cowardice of the police in Great Britain

Dalrymple notes that in the UK, the Chinese flu

revealed how quickly the police could be transformed from a civilian force that protects the population as it goes about its business into a semi-militarised army of quasi-occupation.

The transformation is not new.

It has been a long time since the policeman was the decent citizen’s friend. Under various pressures, not the least of them emanating from intellectuals, he has become a bullying but ineffectual keeper of discipline, whom only the law-abiding fear.

Nice to the nasty, nasty to the nice

Dalrymple first sensed this many years ago when a traffic policeman asked to see his licence.

‘Well, Theodore…’ he started, calling me by my first name when a few years before he would have called me ‘Sir.’ I had gone from being his superior, as a member of the public in whose name he exercised his authority, to being a minor, whom it was his transcendent right to call to order. He was the boss, I the underling.

Now: festooned with the apparatus of oppression

The change in uniform has worked in the same direction.

Since the time of Peel, the uniform of the British policeman was unthreatening, deliberately so, his authority moral rather than physical. Now he is festooned with the apparatus of repression, if not of oppression, though he represses very little of what ought to be repressed — in case it fights back. The modern police intimidate only those who do not need deterring. Those who do need deterring know that they have nothing much to fear from these empty vessels.

Concentrate on the inessential

Dalrymple points out that the Wuhan virus has come as a boon to the British police.

Increasingly criticised for their concentration on pseudo-crimes such as hate speech at the expense of neglecting real crimes such as assault and burglary, to say nothing of organised sexual abuse of young girls by gangs of men of Pakistani origin, they could now bully the population to their heart’s content. And they could imagine that in doing so, they were performing a valuable public service, preserving the law and public health at the same time. Thus they transformed their previous moral and physical cowardice into a virtue.

In bullying the average citizen who was very unlikely to retaliate,

they took no risks, unlike with genuine wrongdoers and law-breakers, who tend to be dangerous.

Ordered to comply with the latest nostrums of political correctness

Most individual policemen joined the force

motivated by some kind of idealism, a desire to do society some service.

Morally bankrupt leadership

Before long, though,

they had these naïve fantasies knocked out of them by the corrupt leadership of the hierarchy which owes its ascendency to its willingness to comply with the latest nostrums of political correctness.

The faint embers of the policeman’s initial idealism were no doubt rekindled by the opportunity to prevent the spread of the China flu, as they supposed that they were doing, but

they far exceeded even their flexible and vaguely-defined authority and began to inspect citizens’ shopping bags to determine whether they were hoarding goods that might be in short supply.

Deterioration in appearance of the gendarmes

Happier days: the képi as sported by Inspector Jacques Clouseau

Dalrymple writes:

Gone is the reassuring képi in favour of the moron’s baseball cap.

Many of the French police have given up trying to look the part and simply wear international slum-costume. They

dress in jeans with a black shirt with the word POLICE across its back.

This is not difficult to imitate,

and makes it impossible to know whether a policeman really is a policeman or a lout in disguise.

The moron’s baseball cap

Thug’s uniform

British policing in the old days

A policeman who was taking early retirement said to Dalrymple:

In the old days, we was nice to the nice people, and we was nasty to the nasty people.

The policeman told Dalrymple that

now that the police were professionally obliged to be nice to everyone, he could no longer stand the work. The strain of exercising no discretion was too great.

A frivolous, hopeless wreck of a police force

Nero’s fiddling was effective firefighting by comparison

Britain has by far the highest rate of violent crime in Western Europe, about five or six times that of Spain, for example. What is the response of the British police?

Dalrymple writes that it is a fact of modern British life that

as the police appear more and more to resemble the paramilitary force of an authoritarian régime or military dictatorship, they become less and less effectual, whom only the law-abiding fear.

They seem to concentrate ever less on real police work, and

engage in parallel pseudo-activities, such as commiserating with the victims of the crimes they have failed to prevent and in the vast majority of cases make no attempt to solve.

He notes that a break-in during which an elderly person is murdered, for example,

is increasingly apt to be described as ‘a burglary that went tragically wrong’.

The British police love to

waste their time on the pseudo-pastoral care of those whom I suppose we must now call their clients.

Their primary object appears to be

work avoidance through work creation, a seemingly frantic activity — while never having to do anything that actually conduces to any conceivable end other than early retirement on the grounds of ill-health through stress.

This is a world

that is forever developing training packages, building and delivering capacity, etc., while actually doing nothing. Nero’s fiddling, by comparison, was effective firefighting – evidence-based, of course. It is always time for thinking outside the box, ringfencing a safe space for blue-skies thinking.

The increasing idleness, frivolity and worthlessness of Britain’s police

They have become, writes Dalrymple,

like a nearly defeated occupying colonial force that, while mayhem reigns everywhere else, has retreated to safe enclaves, there to shuffle paper and produce bogus information to propitiate their political masters.

Their first line of defence

is to refuse to record half the crime that comes to their attention, which itself is less than half the crime committed.

Then, they

refuse to investigate recorded crime, or to arrest the culprits even when it is easy to do so and the evidence against them is overwhelming.

A reliable and trustworthy police force is not a denial of freedom but a precondition of its exercise

This ‘all coppers are bastards’ view of the police has spread, Dalrymple observes,

to a large section of the bourgeois intellectual class. Not long ago a journalist told me, en passant, that he hated the police. I asked why: had they falsely arrested, unjustifiably manhandled, brutally interrogated him? No, he replied: he had no personal reason; he just hated them for what they were. Well, as Lear said, nothing comes of nothing: and the journalist’s hatred of the police was unlikely to have sprung completely at random and fully formed from his consciousness. I suspected, as is so often the case with opinions lightly adopted but firmly held, that this one was forged from a combination of ignorance, dishonesty, and fashion. By expressing a dislike of the police, a bourgeois intellectual is establishing his solidarity with the poor.

But the bourgeois intellectual

needs to find reasons for his opinions: rationalisation is his métier. And it isn’t difficult for him to think up such reasons with regard to the police. Their function is to defend the social order: and since the social order is widely held to be responsible for the poverty of the poor, it follows that the police are in part responsible for that poverty. They are a part of the social injustice system.

This pretence, that the police are

but the executive arm of a hypocritical bourgeoisie determined to preserve its ill-gotten gains at the expense of the poor,

is

terrifyingly shallow when tested against the experience of people who suffer weak policing.

Dalrymple points out that the idea that a juster social order would render the police redundant is

utopian nonsense.

Idle and incompetent police

Screen Shot 2016-05-07 at 14.16.20A few years ago, writes Dalrymple,

my wife called the police when she witnessed a serious crime being committed: arson. Only by persistence did she manage to get the police even to record the crime. (They had no intention of doing anything about it.)

A few minutes later an officer telephoned her

to tell her she had wasted police time; although he had time enough to telephone her to tell her so. The problem was that she had messed up his figures.

Ever since,

I have had difficulty in believing official crime statistics.

A Holy Office

Screen Shot 2016-03-10 at 08.53.25The police in Britain, writes Dalrymple, show a

sinister propensity to make mass arrests after a public outcry about something or other. It is not so much that the people arrested are innocent, but that the police appear to act in response to mob sentiment rather than to transgression of the law. Having ignored evidence of wrongdoing by people in high places for years or even decades, they suddenly act as a Holy Office, perhaps to deflect criticism from themselves.

Both the initial laxity and the subsequent zeal

undermine the impartiality of the law, with serious social consequences: for if the law is not impartial the moral imperative to obey is fatally weakened and people feel morally free to do what they can get away with.

Fuck Tha Police

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.38.38Dalrymple reports that this

charming little ballad,

performed by the gangsta rap group Niggaz With Attitude, is one of UK finance minister George Osborne’s favourites. It contains lines, says Dalrymple, that are

beautifully expressed and just the right message for the black youth of Los Angeles.

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.48.53Here are the lyrics:

Right about now NWA court is in full effect.
Judge Dre presiding in the case of NWA versus the police department.
Prosecuting attorneys are MC Ren Ice Cube and Eazy motheruckin’ E.
Order order order. Ice Cube take the motherfuckin’ stand.
Do you swear to tell the truth the whole truth
and nothin but the truth so help your black arse?

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.36.41Why don’t you tell everybody what the fuck you gotta say?

Fuck tha police
Comin’ straight from the underground
Young nigga got it bad ’cause I’m brown
And not the other colour so police think
They have the authority to kill a minority

Attitude

Attitude

Fuck that shit, ’cause I ain’t tha one
For a punk motherfucka with a badge and a gun
To be beatin’ on, and throwin’ in jail
We could go toe to toe in the middle of a cell

Fuckin’ with me ’cause I’m a teenager
With a little bit of gold and a pager
Searchin’ my car, lookin’ for the product
Thinkin’ every nigga is sellin narcotics

You’d rather see me in the pen
Then me and Lorenzo rollin’ in the Benzo
Beat tha police outta shape
And when I’m finished, bring the yellow tape
To tape off the scene of the slaughter
Still gettin’ swoll off bread and water

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.53.55I don’t know if they fags or what
Search a nigga down and grabbin’ his nuts
And on the other hand, without a gun they can’t get none
But don’t let it be a black and a white one
’cause they slam ya down to the street top
Black police showin’ out for the white cop

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.52.16Ice Cube will swarm
On any motherfucka in a blue uniform
Just ’cause I’m from the CPT, punk police are afraid of me
A young nigga on a warpath
And when I’m finished, it’s gonna be a bloodbath
Of cops, dyin’ in LA
Yo Dre, I got somethin’ to say

Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police.

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.53.32M.C. Ren, will you please give your testimony to the jury about this fucked-up incident.

Fuck tha police and Ren said it with authority
because the niggaz on the street is a majority.
A gang is with whoever I’m stepping
and the mutherfuckin’ weapon
is kept in a stash box, for the so-called law
wishin’ Ren was a nigga that they never saw

Lights start flashin’ behind me
But they’re scared of a nigga so they mace me to blind me
But that shit don’t work, I just laugh
Because it gives ’em a hint not to step in my path

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.58.10To the police I’m sayin’ fuck you punk
Readin’ my rights and shit, it’s all junk
Pullin’ out a silly club, so you stand
With a fake-arsed badge and a gun in your hand

But take off the gun so you can see what’s up
And we’ll go at it punk, I’m a fuck you up

Make ya think I’m a kick your ass
But drop your gat, and Ren’s gonna blast
I’m sneaky as fuck when it comes to crime
But I’m a smoke ’em now, and not next time

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.59.37Smoke any motherfucka that sweats me
Or any asshole that threatens me
I’m a sniper with a hell of a scope
Takin’ out a cop or two, they can’t cope with me

The motherfuckin’ villain that’s mad
With potential to get bad as fuck
So I’m a turn it around
Put in my clip, yo, and this is the sound
Ya, somethin’ like that, but it all depends on the size of the gat

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.58.21Takin’ out a police would make my day
But a nigga like Ren don’t give a fuck to say

Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police.

Police, open now. We have a warrant for Eazy-E’s arrest.
Get down and put your hands up where I can see ’em.
Just shut the fuck up and get your motherfuckin’ arse on the floor.

and tell the jury how you feel abou this bullshit.

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 07.58.53I’m tired of the motherfuckin’ jackin
Sweatin’ my gang while I’m chillin in the shackin’
Shining tha light in my face, and for what?
Maybe it’s because I kick so much butt

I kick arse, or maybe ’cause I blast
On a stupid-arsed nigga when I’m playin’ with the trigga
Of any Uzi or an AK
’cause the police always got somethin’ stupid to say

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 08.04.44They put up my picture with silence
’cause my identity by itself causes violence
The E with the criminal behavior
Yeah, I’m a gangsta, but still I got flavour

Without a gun and a badge, what do ya got?
A sucka in a uniform waitin’ to get shot,
By me, or another nigga.
and with a gat it don’t matter if he’s smarter or bigger
M.C. Ren: Sidle him, kid, he’s from the old school, fool

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 08.03.22And as you all know, E’s here to rule
Whenever I’m rollin, keep lookin’ in the mirror
And there’s no cue, yo, so I can hear a
Dumb motherfucka with a gun

And if I’m rollin’ off the 8, he’ll be tha one
That I take out, and then get away
And while I’m drivin’ off laughin’
This is what I’ll say

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 08.05.10Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police.

The jury has found you guilty of bein’ a redneck,
whitebread, chickenshit motherfucka.
Wait, that’s a lie. That’s a goddamn lie.
I want justice! I want justice!
Fuck you, you black motherfucka!

Fuck the police. Fuck the police. Fuck the police.

Screen Shot 2015-11-06 at 08.03.39