Category Archives: popular music

BBC Radio 1 should be abolished

Screen Shot 2016-08-19 at 10.01.54The existence, says Dalrymple, of the British state broadcaster’s wireless station ‘Radio 1’, which excretes popular music of the worst kind,

is an example of the pervasive corporatist corruption of the British State.

Dalrymple writes:

Nobody who scans through the stations on his car radio can possibly be under the misapprehension that a taste for pop music is not adequately catered for by commercial broadcasters. There is no excuse for a State-promoted and publicly-funded pop music station.

Subsidy of what requires no subsidy

BBC Radio 1 is a means by which

public money is transferred, by royalties and other payments, into the pockets of people who are already rich, in the same way that development aid is the means by which poor people in rich countries give money to rich people in poor countries.

The only justification for a public service broadcaster

is that it broadcasts programmes that would not otherwise be produced, and that are of high artistic or intellectual worth.

But

our cultural and political élites have lost confidence in their judgment as to what is of intrinsic intellectual and artistic value. The measure of the BBC’s success is therefore the size of its audiences. The BBC becomes demotic.

The State and parastatal organisations, Dalrymple observes,

have an inherent and unstoppable tendency to swell grotesquely, especially in our corporatist society which increasingly resembles India during the Licence Raj, in which the public service did not serve and private enterprise was not enterprising.

A popular singer who achieved true greatness

 

Some 4m people attended Umm Kulthum’s funeral, Dalrymple reminds us.

 

Suppression of rock music in public places

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 07.55.25Such a step, writes Dalrymple,

while very tempting, is not the solution. What is required is the elevation of public taste.

This, he says, with characteristic understatement,

might take some time.

When Dalrymple suggested that the prison where he works

Screen Shot 2015-12-03 at 07.47.07should echo to the sound of Gregorian chant,

the prison officers

thought it was a joke.

Rock music, Dalrymple points out,

exerts a brutalising effect, and if it is not the sole cause of many of the unpleasantnesses of modern life, it aggravates them.

It has become

insidiously pervasive in our urban environment. It is like a poisonous gas that a malign authority pumps into our atmosphere, whose doleful effect, and probably purpose, is to destroy our capacity to converse, to concentrate, to reflect. It agitates us, keeps us constantly on the move, makes us impulsive and lacking in judgement.

Sadly, resistance has been feeble.

Defenders and advocates of high culture have been diffident about their claims, and reluctant to resist the relentless advance of a debased popular culture.

Dalrymple, honorary president of the Society for the Suppression of Rock Music, is pessimistic, saying that despite the best of intentions, the society will have

the same practical effect as the Society for the Suppression of Vice, namely nil.

These people are savages

Screen Shot 2015-07-25 at 01.17.16That is what a Martian would conclude, writes Dalrymple, if he were to descend to Earth and were to find himself in the British Isles, and were then played British popular music.

Screen Shot 2015-07-25 at 01.17.01Screen Shot 2015-07-25 at 01.20.07