Category Archives: psychological jargon

Brezhnevian psychoanalytic xyloglottism

Much psychoanalytical writing, writes Dalrymple, has 'all the stylistic flair and intellectual excitement of a speech by Leonid Brezhnev'. Such langue de bois can  be read or heard only 'as an act of religious devotion, or even of contrition'.

Much psychoanalytical writing, writes Dalrymple, has ‘all the stylistic flair and intellectual excitement of a speech by Leonid Brezhnev’. Such langue de bois can be read or heard only ‘as an act of religious devotion, or even of contrition‘.

Bureaucratic mentality

H.M. Prison Winson Green, where Dalrymple was a specialist

H.M. Prison Birmingham

Speaking grosso modo, Dalrymple writes that prison officers he worked with were more astute and kinder than staff at psychiatric hospitals.

They had not had their heads filled with psychological jargon. When they came to me to tell me that a prisoner was not himself, or was acting strangely, or that ‘he’s not your typical con’, I soon learnt to take their observations seriously.

Rampton Secure Hospital

Rampton Secure Hospital

Dalrymple says that prisoners he knew were in general

far more afraid of psychiatric hospitals than they were of prisons. One of their most plaintive cries was, ‘You’re not nutting me off, are you, doctor?’

In official reports of disastrous cases in psychiatric hospitals, salient phrases include ‘lessons have been learnt’ and ‘errors of communication’.

One could write almost all reports on disastrous cases before they have occurred. By ‘lessons have been learnt’ is meant ‘it will be exactly the same next time’.

The lesson that has been learnt

is always that a new form, longer and more complex than the old, should be introduced. The form-filling gets in the way of genuine contact with or concern for the patient. The form-filling is the work itself.