Category Archives: psychopathic sadists

Glamour of ultra-violence

Dalrymple writes that when, as a medical student, he emerged from the cinema having seen the 1971 film of the Anthony Burgess novel A Clockwork Orange (1962),

I was astonished and horrified to see a group of young men outside dressed up as droogs.

He explains that in England, the film’s detractors

wanted it banned, charging that it glamourised and thereby promoted violence.

Anthony Burgess: his A Clockwork Orange (1962) remains a novel of immense power. Linguistically inventive, socially prophetic, and philosophically profound, it comes very close to being a work of genius.

The young men dressed as droogs

seemed to confirm the charge, though of course it is one thing to imitate a form of dress and quite another to imitate behaviour.

Still,

even a merely sartorial identification with psychopathic violence shocked me, for it implied an imaginative sympathy with such violence; and seeing those young men outside the cinema was my first intimation that art, literature, and ideas might have profound—and not necessarily favourable—social consequences.

Dalrymple notes that Burgess came to dislike the novel

because he did not want to go down in literary history as the author of a book made famous, or notorious, by a film.

Omertà of the Mohammedan convicts

Bourhan Hraichie

Bourhan Hraichie

Men don’t need ideology to be psychopathic sadists, writes Dalrymple, but it may help.

Against the interpretation of Bourhan Hraichie’s attack on Michael O’Keefe

as a manifestation of purely personal sadism is his previously expressed support for the Islamic State — a case of elective affinity, no doubt.

The Mid North Coast Correctional Centre in Aldavilla, outside Kemsey

The Mid North Coast Correctional Centre in Aldavilla, outside Kemsey

There is also the fact that

no one in the cells nearest to Hraichie called the guards on their emergency bells for fear of retaliation by Hraichie and his acolytes.

In other words,

there was a powerful group of prisoners in the jail who thought and felt as Hraichie did, or would at least obey his orders. The Islamists are thus a kind of prison Mafia, with their own version of omertà.