Category Archives: psychotherapy

W.E. Henley’s toxic stoicism

W.E. Henley: emotional constipation

Dalrymple draws attention to the distressing mental disorder exhibited in ‘Invictus’ (1875):

Out of the night that covers me
Black as the pit from pole to pole,
I thank whatever gods may be
For my unconquerable soul.

In the fell clutch of circumstance,
I have not winced nor cried aloud.
Under the bludgeonings of chance
My head is bloody, but unbow’d.

Beyond this place of wrath and tears
Looms but the Horror of the shade,
And yet the menace of the years
Finds, and shall find me, unafraid.

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.

He notes that the deranged ‘fortitude’ and emotional repression that the poem betrays are deeply problematic, being

part of what is known, including by the American Psychological Association, as toxic masculinity.

‘Fortitude’ is treason to the self

Dalrymple says that

if only Henley had been true to himself, he wouldn’t have bothered with all that captain-of-my-soul stuff.

Instead he would have gone into

  • counselling
  • cognitive behavioural therapy
  • psychotherapy

Courses of treatment of this kind, which might usefully have been accompanied by colectomy, frontal leucotomy, Metrazol-induced convulsion therapy, laxative therapy, and insulin coma therapy (Insulinschockbehandlung),

would really have sorted him out and rid him of the poisonous notion that misfortune was something to be overcome by making the best of things.

Dalrymple points out that in advertising his neurosis by producing verse of such hysterical irrationality, Henley

set a very bad example, for not everyone can overcome misfortune as did he. By becoming famous, by achieving a great deal despite pain and illness all his life, he inhibited myriad others from admitting their vulnerability and victimhood, thereby reinforcing toxic masculinity.

Rather,

it was Henley’s duty to have been angry and resentful at his fate, thereby giving work to psychologists and psychotherapists. If everyone went round being the captain of his soul, what would there be for psychologists to do? They would need counselling about their loss of income.

Henley lived in Woking in the latter part of his life, though he also maintained a flat in this Battersea block

St John the Baptist Churchyard, Cockayne Hatley, Bedfordshire

Užívání antidepresiv je moderní obdoba vymítání ďábla

Není to psychologie, jste to vy: přestaňte vaše chování zaměňovat za nemoc

Literatura, vzkazuje Dalrymple,

přinesla lidstvu daleko více světla, než v co psychologie vůbec může kdy doufat.

Místo nalézání sebe sama během dlouhých let terapie pomocí povídání o sobě,

byste se raději měli věnovat nějakému zájmu nebo činnosti.

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Dalrymple’s Disease

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The disease, also known as Dalrymple Syndrome, is included in the manual

This crushing book-buying illness

Dalrymple has long been a victim of a malady that few observers have spoken of (possibly out of embarrassment, though the patient himself is often unaware of, or indifferent to, the condition), one that is far less common than it was but which is still occasionally diagnosed in not wholly statistically insignificant numbers, namely book-purchasing disorder.

The layman is all too apt to dismiss the illness as merely nauseating and hateful to the onlooker, but it is important to recognise that members of the book-buying disorder community are suffering from a severe, apparently intractable, condition or affliction that requires to be understood and treated non-judgmentally.

Sadly exhibiting one of the characteristic symptoms, Dalrymple openly tells an interviewer that he

cannot walk by a bookstore without buying a book.

Bibliopsychosis

Dalrymple's bedroom

Dalrymple’s bedroom

Dalrymple Disorder is included in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, with the hoarding of second-hand or antiquarian books being recognised as a psychosis for which therapy is urgently needed. (Penetration disorder, impulse-control disorder, gambling disorder, racism, caffeine-induced sleep disorder, homophobia, occupational defiant disorder, mother-in-law relational disorder, hypoactive sexual desire disorder, Islamophobia, hyperactive sexual desire disorder, sexism, and alternating hypoactive-hyperactive sexual desire disorder, are also set out in the manual.)

Dalrymple is required to undergo lengthy treatment for his book-buying disorder and

must stay in therapy, so that the doctor keeps getting paid.

What is book-hoarding disorder? US medical authorities have described it as follows.

Dalrymple's garage

Dalrymple’s garage

Book-hoarding disorder is characterized by the persistent difficulty in discarding or parting with books, regardless of the value others, such as spouses or other family members, may attribute to them.

The book-hoarding behaviours (focal sepsis may be present), collectively known loosely as Dalrymple’s Disease,

usually have harmful effects—emotional, neurophysiological, social, political, gastrointestinal, ethical, dental (halitosis is often severe), environmental, financial, theological, paranormal and legal—for the person suffering from the disorder and their spouse (or spouses, up to four, if the sufferer is a male Muslim) or other family members.

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Dalrymple’s WC

For people who hoard books,

the quantity of their collected volumes (the quality will not be discussed here) sets them apart from people with normal book-collecting behaviors.

They obsessively accumulate a large number of books

that often fill up or clutter active living areas of the home or workplace to the extent that the active living areas’ intended use (dining, laundry, defæcation, gardening, table-tennis, bathing, baseball, DIY, micturition, off-road parking, television viewing, copulation, social gatherings, food preparation, etc.) becomes supererogatory and is severely constrained or precluded, with adverse effects for spouses, other family members, friends, work colleagues, visiting representatives of city and federal authorities, etc.

Dalrymple's dining-room

Corner of Dalrymple’s dining-room

Distressing

Symptoms of the bibliomanic frenzy

cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, technological, eschatological, educational, sexual, vocational, ecclesiastical, uro-genital, occupational, horticultural, supernatural, teleological or other important areas of functioning including maintaining a minimally adequate living environment for self, spouse and/or others.

While some people who hoard books, such as Dalrymple, may not appear particularly distressed by their behaviours,

their behaviors can be deeply distressing to large numbers of other people, such as spouses, other family members, mailmen, district attorneys, electricians, infantrymen, landlords, Black Panthers, fire-fighters, mom-and-pop store owners, Klansmen, bellhops, veterinary surgeons, burglars, used-automobile salespersons, leaders of the LGBT community, lumberjacks, Vietnam vets, railroad employees, ISIS soldiers, narcotics officers, plumbers, persons of color, Jehovah’s Witnesses, cleaners, sheriffs or their deputies, satanists, electrical contractors, professional gamblers, gardeners, racists, neighbors, intimate-apparel vendors, double-glazing salespersons, and city and federal authorities.

Book-hoarding compulsion

A section of Dalrymple's kitchen

Section of Dalrymple’s kitchen

can often be quite severe and even threatening.

Beyond the highly negative mental impact of BPD,

the accumulation of old, flaking, dirty, dusty, greasy, moldy and often frankly disgusting volumes creates a public safety and health issue by overwhelming people’s homes and giving rise to serious and potentially deadly fall and fire hazards, especially in the fall or winter, when the compulsion is at its most acute.

Treatment

screen-shot-2016-11-06-at-14-12-45Indicated treatment modalities where mild to moderate Dalrymple’s Disease is diagnosed include:

  • frontal leucotomy: nerve pathways in bibliobrain lobes are severed — with dispatch and some force — from those in other regions
  • Metrazol-induced convulsion therapy: sharp anti-bibliomanic shocks are administered, giving rise to uncontrollable convulsions
  • insulin coma therapy (Insulinschockbehandlung): the patient is turned hypoglycemic with repeated injected insulin, causing repeated vomiting and loss of control of the bowels, also unbearable cramps, so that book-hoarding becomes not just unpleasant but painful in the extreme

    Staircase in the Dalrymple house

    Staircase in the Dalrymple house

Dalrymple's drawing-room

Part of Dalrymple’s drawing-room

Dissatisfaction is the permanent condition of mankind

Screen Shot 2015-05-07 at 08.56.39Witch-doctoring, says Dalrymple (from 16:15),

can work for those who believe in witches and spirits.

However,

there is no total explanation of the human condition. There is no theory that will release us from dissatisfaction.

Get a hold of yourself!

Screen Shot 2015-04-20 at 10.28.10Dalrymple argues that psychology

doesn’t help us understand ourselves. In the last 100 years we haven’t found anything of any value. We haven’t moved beyond Shakespeare.

On psychoanalysis, he remarks:

I daresay some people will have benefited from it, but they will have benefited from witch-doctors. It doesn’t help us to understand the human condition. I’m not sure anything will ever do better than literature, and even literature doesn’t help that much.