Category Archives: public health

Sweetened drinks are an æsthetic abomination

Screen Shot 2015-08-06 at 07.44.34Their consumption, writes Dalrymple, is

consequent upon a mass outbreak of childishness. I want people to suffer ill-effects from their bad taste.

Micronesian pioneers of the diabetogenic diet

Dalrymple pays a visit to Nauru, where half the population has type 2 diabetes. Thanks to phosphate rock,

from a life of subsistence on fish and coconuts they went straight to being millionaires. They abandoned their traditional diet and started to eat, on average, 7,000 calories per day. They liked sweet drinks and consumed Fanta by the case-load. For those who liked alcohol as well there was Château d’Yquem. They were unique in the world in being both rich and having a short life expectancy.

Screen Shot 2015-08-06 at 07.55.12Type 2 diabetes is

a threat to public health that dwarfs Ebola virus in scale, but kills slowly and undramatically, rather by stealth than by coups de théâtre. No one ever walked around in spacesuits because there was a type 2 diabetic on the ward.

Goddess of climatic destruction

Screen Shot 2015-05-10 at 08.37.56

The climatic Kali, bringer-about of global catastrophe: do not seek to deny her, for all our sages say that prayer rituals and sacrifice are the only means by which she may be appeased

How the climate theology has taken hold of people’s minds

Dalrymple comes across this paragraph in an article in the British Journal of Psychiatry:

Climate change is the largest global health threat of the 21st century, and despite limited empirical evidence, it is expected directly and indirectly to harm communities’ psychosocial wellbeing.

Dalrymple comments:

This is not so much science as religion, in which the destructive bringer-about of catastrophe, a kind of Kali, must be appeased by word, puja and sacrifice.

Anglo-Saxon gastronomic impoverishment

British culinary imbecility British culinary imbecility

Dalrymple writes:

I happen to dislike prepared foods, though more on æsthetic than on health grounds; I see what people choose and am appalled by their choices, which seem to me to be those of overindulged children who have never matured in their tastes.

He has

no real objection to regulation of the sugar content of prepared foods, provided it was done on intellectually honest grounds. Those grounds would not be that people are incapable of acting other than as they do, but that they are too idle to cook, their tastes and pleasures are too brutish, their habits too gross, for them to be left free to choose for themselves. Someone who knows better must guide them.