Category Archives: public spending

‘None of the news that disturbs our smugness’ is the Guardian’s motto

Not only, writes Dalrymple, is the Guardian

the sole remaining daily newspaper in Britain whose content is mostly devoted to serious matters, it is the only one that the unacknowledged legislators of the world, the intelligentsia, take seriously.

This, he explains,

is a disaster for the country. Though it occasionally allows a dissenting voice, the Guardian has consistently advocated a demoralisation of the population, followed by increased state intervention and, of course, public spending to alleviate the consequences of that demoralisation. No wonder the BBC [the British state broadcaster] advertises for personnel exclusively in its pages.

Surrounding the newspaper’s content is

an aura of dishonesty and evasiveness.

Its writers aim to avoid

something they had rather not acknowledge: the need to think, in particular about the unrealistic presuppositions of their worldview. Not ‘All the news that’s fit to print’ but ‘None of the news that disturbs our liberal smugness and sense of moral superiority’ is the motto of the Guardian.

Britain has only one important newspaper: the Guardian

Screen Shot 2015-01-18 at 23.03.50Not only, writes Dalrymple, is the Guardian

the sole remaining daily newspaper in Britain whose content is mostly devoted to serious matters, it is the only one that the unacknowledged legislators of the world, the intelligentsia, take seriously.

This, he explains,

is a disaster for the country. Though it occasionally allows a dissenting voice, the Guardian has consistently advocated a demoralisation of the population, followed by increased state intervention and, of course, public spending to alleviate the consequences of that demoralisation. No wonder the BBC [the British state broadcaster] advertises for personnel exclusively in its pages.

Surrounding the newspaper’s content is

an aura of dishonesty and evasiveness.

Its writers aim to avoid

something they had rather not acknowledge: the need to think, in particular about the unrealistic presuppositions of their worldview. Not ‘All the news that’s fit to print’ but ‘None of the news that disturbs our liberal smugness and sense of moral superiority’ is the motto of the Guardian.

ZZZ rating

Screen Shot 2013-04-24 at 03.00.47

Quiet please. Research on bonds being undertaken

Moody’s has been sleeping on the job for years. Its ineptitude, writes Dalrymple, is demonstrated by the high ranking it used to accord Britain.

Dalrymple examines various aspects of the British economic mess that the rating agency, luxuriating in a deep slumber, failed to notice. For instance, the British prime minister Tony Blair used repeatedly to refer to big spending increases

as ‘investments’. So did [the chancellor and Blair’s successor as premier] Gordon Brown.

Blair

felt it unnecessary to provide evidence that this spending brought benefit, economic or otherwise, or to consider its costs. He spoke as if the money came from a generous extraterrestrial donor and not from higher taxes and government borrowing.

Dalrymple concludes:

A country with a government that cannot tell the difference between investment and expenditure is one from which lenders would best steer clear.