Category Archives: slavery

The opinion that dare not speak its name

Freedom is slavery

Diversity is uniformity

Tolerance is conformity

In today’s America, writes Dalrymple, you can have any opinion you like as long as it is a socially liberal one. Otherwise you’ll find yourself in the dustbin of history.

The view, for example, that homosexuals should not be permitted to conduct ceremonies that ape the institution of marriage

is now so outré, so utterly beyond the pale, that nobody is allowed to espouse it in public and keep his job.

Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live

If you enunciate such a view, you will be treated as if you had

pronounced himself in favour of lynching or slavery. No decent person can hold such an opinion.

The magazine Forbes judges that if you give voice to such thoughtcrime, you may be able to save your job, but only if you issue a recantation and an apology. Forbes thus, Dalrymple notes,

is the place at which billionaire capitalism meets the Maoist Cultural Revolution.

Deny for a second that legalisation of homosexual marriage is fully in the interests of natural justice, humanity and civilisation, and you will be, Forbes believes, ‘on the wrong side of history’. In other words, homosexual marriage

is not so much a legislative choice as an institution whose development was teleologically immanent in the whole of human history. It is what the Second World War was all about, though the soldiers who fought in it didn’t realise it.

Dustbin of history

The world must be kept free of any kind of moral complexity

Cherchez le colonialiste britannique

The diversity to which the liberal claims devotion is a sham

Dalrymple occasionally meets among his patients

Jamaican homosexuals who have received political asylum in Britain. (In Jamaica, laws against sodomy remain on the books, though they are rarely enforced.)

Leafing through the British newspaper the Guardian, he comes across an article

ascribing blame for this Jamaican illiberalism not to the Jamaicans but to the British. The Jamaicans, it argued, had a fear and hatred of homosexuality because British slave masters sodomised slaves one-and-three-quarter centuries ago.

The article’s author allowed that other factors played a role:

Jamaican men tended to be swaggeringly macho as a consequence of the powerlessness they felt under the colonial and neocolonial regimes. Furthermore, Jamaica is a poor country, and its population poorly educated. Why is it poor? Because so large a proportion of its budget goes to service the national debt—a burden developed countries have laid on it. If Jamaicans were richer and better educated, they would be more tolerant of homosexuals.

This argument, writes Dalryjmple,

is paradigmatic of the liberal mindset regarding supposed victim populations such as the Jamaicans, who nevertheless hold views and behave in ways that liberals find distasteful. The blame is not theirs but belongs to the perpetrator group of which the liberal disapproves. The victim group—in this case the Jamaicans—find themselves dehumanised. They can do no wrong because, as victims, they are not moral agents. Their opinions, if similar to those widespread among us not so very long ago, are not theirs, but are unthinking emotional responses to historical experiences—not real opinions but like the automatic responses that rats develop when exposed to conditioning stimuli.

The liberal’s devotion to diversity

disappears. Jamaica, which for all its faults has a democratic method of altering its laws, is to be regarded as suffering from a neurotic illness if it does not go along with current liberal notions of right and wrong.

The diversity to which the liberal claims devotion

is a stalking horse to destroy moral attitudes of which he disapproves, so as to replace them with others that he regards as universal and binding.

The slaves are revolting

We live, writes Dalrymple,

in societies in which there are islands of licence in an ocean of regulation. Perhaps that explains why there are nightclubs (themselves regulated, of course) called Manumission, and why our entertainments grow ever more coarse, vulgar, and extreme. They are the slave revolts de nos jours.

Slavish Britons

Dalrymple points out taht jobs depend on trade, not the EU

Dalrymple points out that jobs depend on trade, not the EU

Dalrymple lives some of the time in England, and returning to his house there one fine day he discovers that a pamphlet has been pushed through his letterbox from a group called The In Campaign Ltd.

The document is a repetitive shambles of variously feeble, dubious, specious and dishonest assertions, with heavy reliance on suggestio falsi, weasel words, misrepresentations and lies. The arguments are all, Dalrymple notes,

economistic in nature.

The assumption, he says,

is that the whole question is whether we have more or less in our pocket after the referendum. If it is really true that we are prepared to abandon our sovereignty for the sake of 50p [75¢] a week in our pocket, then it would be true that we do not deserve any sovereignty. We would indeed be a nation of slaves.

Are you sure?

Are you sure?

 

The will forgone, the self dissolved

Hitler, writes Dalrymple, was offered this kind of abjection:

Like any girl, I’d like to touch him, wherever one went with him there was always a seismic shift, space and time changed.

These are words, says Dalrymple,

of natural, or at least willing, slaves who seek to dissolve their selves and forgo their will for that of some other person.

O círculo vicioso da miséria moral

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Portuguese-language edition

Dalrymple’s Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass is, writes Thomas Sowell,

an insightful account of the dire consequences that the welfare state has led to among low-income whites in England. Many will recognise striking similarities to problems among low-income blacks in America — problems often blamed on ‘a legacy of slavery’ but which have followed in the wake of the welfare state in England among whites with no legacy of slavery.

How the British are manumitted

Screen Shot 2015-07-14 at 23.17.38The attitude of mass-circulation British newspapers to vulgarity tends to be ambivalent, writes Dalrymple.

In theory, they are against it. In practice, they do much to advance vulgarity’s cause.

As vulgarity correspondent for one of these papers, Dalrymple is sent to the Spanish island of Ibiza, where he witnesses

nightly drunken Saturnalias on the beaches and in the streets.

The British holidaymakers there are

proud of their disgusting behaviour, exhibitionistic of it.

He notes that one of the nightclubs is called Manumission, and asks what kind of slavery it is from which those who enter seek release. Perhaps it is

  • the slavery of having to earn a living, often in a capacity below that which their education had led them to expect or hope for
  • the slavery of social convention (though, acting in crowds, they are deeply conventional people)
  • the slavery of consciousness, the sheer inescapability of thought

Another nightclub is called Amnesia. Dalrymple says:

If I were opening a new nightclub in Ibiza in competition with Amnesia, I would call it Anæsthesia.

Revenge of the nightclub-queue slaves

Screen Shot 2015-06-11 at 07.49.29Observe, writes Dalrymple, a queue of people waiting to get into a nightclub,

how meekly they allow themselves to be searched by the thuggish-looking bouncer-greeters (who incidentally have a very high rate of violence towards women). How the bouncer-greeters lord it over them! What power, moral and physical, they wield!

The bouncers have a star-like quality:

I have seen a greeter-bouncer drive by (in a pastel-shaded BMW), and have heard the admiring comments of those he and his type have humiliated a hundred times.

The people in the queue,

supposedly so rebellious and anti-authority, are willing to endure almost any humiliation so long as they gain entry into one of the circles of hell, where the noise is so great that they enter a trance-like state almost at once. Slaves could hardly be more abject.

It is an illusion that everyone wants to be free,

but everyone wants to assert himself, and no one likes to be humiliated.

How do the abject slaves of the nightclub queues revenge themselves for their humiliation at the hands of the greeter-bouncers?

By being insolent towards those in authority who nevertheless have an infinite duty of care towards them, such as doctors, who cannot answer back. A young man who grovels to a greeter-bouncer in a night club queue will have no hesitation in cheeking a doctor and letting him know who is boss.

The doctor

cannot refuse to cure a patient merely because the patient shows him scant respect, and for the first time the patient knows it. Thus we see the dialectic of dependence and resentment in a population that is no longer expected to regulate itself, but expects always to be protected from the consequences of its own tastes and conduct.

 

Britons ever, ever, ever shall be slaves

The English have become ‘natural slaves‘, says Dalrymple. They ‘expect and allow officialdom to rule their lives’.