Category Archives: transsexualism

Strident transsexualism is as absurd as it is disastrous

‘In the space of the past few years,’ writes Dalrymple, ‘a full-scale ideological movement has grown up that will not be satisfied until the rest of society accedes to its demands, which include reform of language. The demands are kaleidoscopic, constantly changing, as the ideology twists and turns in an attempt to overcome its contradictions. Those who want a forensic dissection of this ideology, and a masterly exposé of its absurdities, as well as an account of its disastrous practical consequences in a society too lacking in moral confidence to oppose it (or any other sufficiently strident ideology), would do well to read this book.’

Experiments only somewhat ethically superior to Mengele’s

Josef Mengele

How those who crave ideology seek fulfilment

Dalrymple writes that since the failure of Marxism, one of the strangest of the miscellany of sub-ideologies that have proliferated is that of strident transsexualism. In the space of the past few years,

a full-scale ideological movement has grown up that will not be satisfied until the rest of society accedes to its demands, which include the reform of language. The demands are kaleidoscopic, constantly changing, as the ideology twists in an attempt to overcome its contradictions.

This absurd ideology has

disastrous practical consequences in a society too lacking in moral confidence to oppose it (or any other sufficiently strident ideology).

Dalrymple points out that as a result of the supine acceptance of the ideology,

full-scale experiments are being conducted on children, such as the use of puberty-blocking drugs, by doctors without any clear idea of the long-term outcome — experiments only somewhat ethically superior to those of Dr Mengele, insofar as the children themselves agree to them or even demand them, though at an age at which one would not normally think of children as being able to make such far-reaching choices.

A very small pressure group, an insignificant proportion of the population,

has been able to create an atmosphere or climate in Western societies in which well-meaning, honest, and respectable people, including experts, are unwilling for fear of reprisal to express dissenting views about a matter of considerable symbolic if not numerical importance.

The will to power

seems to have infected people who once might have been content to live quietly, power itself now being the only goal worth aiming for in the absence of anything more elevated or elevating.

Pressure groups of this kind

do not so much seek to persuade us by the force of their arguments as irreversibly to change our mentalities. The freedom that many people desire is the freedom to limit other people’s freedom.

An’ the dawn comes up like thunder outer Berkeley ‘crost the Bay!

O brave new world, That has such people in’t!

The latest mad orthodoxy

The current monomania, writes Dalrymple, is transsexualism. He notes that the National Association of Head Teachers

has issued guidance (the kind that communist dictators used to issue when they visited locomotive repair workshops or sausage factories, their words of wisdom on every subject being taken down by scribes), to the effect that there should be books in all schools for children under the age of 11 about ‘transgender’ parents, and that ‘trans people, their issues and experiences’, should be ‘celebrated across the school’.

It raises the question, says Dalrymple,

of how one celebrates transsexualism: dancing round a maypole hung with packets of oestrogen or testosterone?

 

Indispensable faculty in those who would produce great art

Joyce’s Ulysses on one of the shelves of the personal library of Theodore Dalrymple, Ardèche, 2017

Dalrymple points out that self-censorship

does not at the moment enjoy a very happy reputation. It is associated in our minds with an avoidance—a cowardly or dishonest avoidance—of difficult or dangerous subjects: the intellectual nullity of contemporary Islam, for example, or the nature of transsexualism.

However, he argues that the faculty of self-censorship is

indispensable in those who would produce great art.

It is the sense

not merely of what should be left out, but of what should not be said.

Without self-censorship, we enter

an arms race of vulgar sensationalism.

El Greco, El expolio, 1577-79, sacristy of Toledo Cathedral