Category Archives: victimhood (political advantages of)

Radical anti-racism

It represents an employment opportunity, writes Dalrymple,

for bureaucrats of limited ability.

It has also persuaded many young men of Jamaican descent that

when someone asks them at three in the morning to turn their music down, or upbraids them in any other way or circumstances, he is motivated by racism. This is convenient for the young men, who are enabled to behave badly while convinced of their moral superiority based on permanent, insuperable and existential victimhood; it is also convenient for the anti-racist bureaucracy, who assure themselves of ‘work’, that is to say a salary.

But Dalrymple points out that the Jamaicans

are not a race, and their conduct is in marked contrast (at least in my experience) with that of West Africans — and even West Indians who come from other islands.

Racism today, he notes,

is of the subtle kind that requires a specialist armed with an anti-racist Malleus Maleficarum to detect.

The Guardian’s four-legs-good, two-legs-bad worldview

The newspaper’s deafening silence on South Africa

Dalrymple writes that when the South African parliament passed a motion, by 241 votes to 83, to change the nation’s constitution to allow white-owned land to be expropriated without compensation, the Guardian

was coy about reporting it. Even now, it has not mentioned the measure on its website, except indirectly.

Dalrymple asks:

Why the silence on this important development? Perhaps because it is an embarrassment to the paper’s view of the world. How is one to report the near-genocidal and famine-promoting wishes of people whose rôle in life for so many years has been that of victims of injustice?

How Mobutu bared his teeth against the rotten imperialists

Prophet of ‘national authenticity’

One man who was keenly aware of the political advantages to be derived from assumption of victimhood was Mobutu Sese Seko, Dalrymple reminds us. In order, Dalrymple explains,

to overcome the effects of a colonial past, and in the name of authenticity, Mobutu decreed that all Zaïrian citizens abandon their European names — to which they had been accustomed since birth — and take on African ones. Likewise, no one was henceforth to wear a collar and tie; instead Mobutu had designed a national costume, which he imposed. In this way, he made himself all-important.

However,

when he had a toothache, he commandeered a jet aëroplane of the national airline and flew to Paris for dental treatment.

Leading by example: Mobutu models his abacost (‘à bas le costume’) menswear designs

Jet aircraft of the type commandeered by Mobutu for visits to the dentist