Category Archives: welfarism

Britain is debased, dishonoured and debauched, and Brexit is no cure

Britain’s social model

The condition of England, Dalrymple writes, is a terrible warning to the rest of Europe. We’re not talking about Brexit but about the social devastation caused by a combination of the welfare state and a certain type of culture, by comparison with which Brexit is a trivial matter.

A British teenager, for instance, has a trio of parents:

  • the State
  • its mother
  • television & internet

Britain’s social capital

An Englishman’s street is his dining room. Britishers eat almost as much on the street as at home. And because they are antisocial, they drop the fast-food rubbish around them as cows excrete in the fields.

Dalrymple’s objection to the welfare state as practised in England is not that it is economically unsustainable — though it might be — but that it has exercised a profoundly corrupting effect on the human personality.

Britain’s social future

 

Nihilistic alienation in America

The folly of welfarism and affirmative action

Dalrymple ventures to indict

all the efforts undertaken in recent years by government welfare programmes and institutions that practice affirmative action, such as universities, to ameliorate the condition of underclass blacks.

He points out that,

far from ameliorating the situation, the billions spent on welfare programmes, and the intellectual ingenuity expended on justifying the unjustifiable in the form of affirmative action, have resulted in a hatred that is bitter and widespread among those condescended to in this manner.

Welfarism is the motor of Western Europe’s decline

The obsession with social security, writes Dalrymple,

has created rigid social and economic systems that are extremely resistant to change.

The fixation on state handouts

is in turn connected with a fear of the future: for the future has brought catastrophe and relative decline for more than a century.

A vicious circle

What is it that Western Europeans fear?

An open economy holds out more threat to them than promise: they believe that the outside world will bring them not trade and wealth, but unemployment and a loss of comfort. They are inclined to retire into their shell and succumb to protectionist temptation, internally with regard to the job market and externally with regard to other nations. The more those other nations advance, the more necessary does protection seem to them.

Bone-idle Britishers

Why is it, asks Dalrymple, that England has had such high levels of youth unemployment for so many years while simultaneously importing very large numbers of young people from abroad to perform unskilled work? It is, he says,

an awkward question to ask because it can so easily inflame insensate xenophobia, but it is nevertheless an important one that I have never seen asked in the public prints. By not asking it, we avoid the corollary questions of what social and economic policies have led to this anomaly.

These questions

in turn might undermine our confidence in the presumptions of our social and economic policies of the last three-quarters of a century.

Better, then,

not to notice the anomaly, let alone try to think about how it has arisen, and to pretend, rather, that more of the same, perhaps slightly better-refined or targeted (more training for youth workers in Toxteth, for example), will solve our problems.

Looters at the ready

The threat of barbarism and mob rule

In conditions of anarchy, after, for instance, a hurricane,

a crude and violent order, based upon brute force and psychopathic ruthlessness, soon establishes itself, which regards philanthropy not as a friend but as an enemy and a threat.

While Dalrymple acknowledges that

all of us who were born with original sin (or whatever you want to call man’s fundamental natural flaws) are capable of savagery in the right circumstances,

he points out that by no means all of us

immediately lose our veneer of civilisation in conditions of adversity, however great. A veneer may be thin, but this makes it more, not less, precious, and its upkeep more, not less, important.

Looters, Dalrymple notes,

look bitter, angry, resentful, and vengeful as they go about what British burglars are inclined (in all seriousness) to call their ‘work’. The gangs are reported to have used racial taunts during their depredations. In all probability, the looters believe that, in removing as much as they can from stores, they are not so much stealing as performing acts of restitution or compensatory justice for wrongs received. They are not wronging the owners of the stores; on the contrary, the owners of the stores have wronged them over the years by restricting their access to the goods they covet and to which they believe they have a right. The hurricane has thus given them the opportunity to take justice into their own hands and settle old scores.

It is, he says,

a terrible indictment of all the efforts undertaken in recent years by government welfare programmes and institutions that practice affirmative action, such as universities, to ameliorate the condition of underclass blacks. It implies that the nihilistic alienation of the looters and gang members is as great as that to be found in Soweto at the height of the apartheid regime. Far from ameliorating the situation, then, the billions spent on welfare programmes, and the intellectual ingenuity expended on justifying the unjustifiable in the form of affirmative action, have resulted in a hatred that is bitter and widespread among those condescended to in this manner.

Rotten, skiving Britain

img_3044Dalrymple answers your questions on the land of scroungers

How many of the English are pretending to be ill in order to be able to live on handouts?

In Britain we have the remarkable situation where we have more invalids than after the First World War: 3m, of whom 2m could probably work.

Rewards for, to put it most kindly, the workshy. Is that not a scandal?

It is a fraud on a large scale: deeply corrupting of the recipients, who wrongly believe they are sick; the government, which shifts people out of the unemployment statistics; and the medical profession.

Aren’t the UK Tories capping working-age welfare payments at £500 per family regardless of the number of children?

It won’t work. A little bit of drug-trafficking here and illegal activity there will make up for the cuts.

Incentives to be a cheat and a slob

Why is nothing done about it? Is this wilful blindness?

The entrepreneurial parasitism of benefit recipients is not recognised by naïve bureaucrats. The recipients know how to manipulate things to get the maximum benefit; they are reacting to incentives.

Why are there so few White Britons in basic service jobs?

Culture, the welfare system and rigidities in the housing market are to blame.

Employers greatly prefer, for example, Poles, do they not?

Poles are better than the English in a work ethic sense, and they often speak better English.

Drug addicts

Do you have any time for libertarian arguments on drug legalisation?

John Stuart Mill (who ­argued that individuals should be free to harm themselves but not others) thought that fathers who abandoned their children should be put to forced labour. You don’t hear that bit quoted much by legalisation advocates.

Fifth-rate intellectuals

Who is responsible for the British mess?

Most of the blame for the social dysfunction lies with our intellectual class, who revel in this behaviour.

Familial disintegration 

To what extent do women bear some of the blame for domestic violence?

Men who commit violence against women should, of course, be put in prison, but the idea that women are playing no part in this is wrong.

O círculo vicioso da miséria moral

Screen Shot 2016-01-02 at 08.54.53

Portuguese-language edition

Dalrymple’s Life at the Bottom: The Worldview That Makes the Underclass is, writes Thomas Sowell,

an insightful account of the dire consequences that the welfare state has led to among low-income whites in England. Many will recognise striking similarities to problems among low-income blacks in America — problems often blamed on ‘a legacy of slavery’ but which have followed in the wake of the welfare state in England among whites with no legacy of slavery.

Doctrine that points the way to revenge

Imagine yourself, writes Dalrymple, a youth in Les Tarterêts or Les Musiciens,

  • intellectually alert but not well educated
  • believing yourself to be despised because of your origins by the larger society that you were born into
  • permanently condemned to unemployment by the system that contemptuously feeds and clothes you
  • surrounded by a contemptible nihilistic culture of despair, violence, and crime

Is it not possible, he says, that you would seek a doctrine that would

  • explain your predicament
  • justify your wrath
  • point the way towards your revenge
  • guarantee your salvation

Might you not

seek a ‘worthwhile’ direction for the energy, hatred, and violence seething within you, a direction that would enable you to do evil in the name of ultimate good?

Les Tarterêts

Les Tarterêts

The curse of welfarism

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 10.42.01

Young British mothers

Dalrymple writes that there is in the West, and especially in Britain,

a rising tide of neglect, cruelty, Sadism, and joyous malignity.

Where does the evil come from? Dalrymple points out that

a necessary, though not sufficient, condition is the welfare state, which makes it possible, and sometimes advantageous, to behave like this.

Fatherhood

Young British fathers

The State

is the parent of last resort—or of first resort. The State gives assistance to the mother of any child, once it has come into being. In matters of public housing, it is advantageous for a mother to put herself at a disadvantage, to be a single mother, without support from the fathers of the children and dependent on the State for income. She is then a priority; she won’t pay local taxes, rent, or utility bills.

Screen Shot 2015-10-27 at 10.39.30As for the men, the State

absolves them of all responsibility for their children. The State is father to the child. The biological father is free to use whatever income he has as pocket money, for entertainment and little treats. He is reduced to the status of a child, though a spoilt child with the physical capabilities of a man: petulant, demanding, querulous, self-centred, and violent. The violence escalates and becomes a habit. A spoilt brat becomes an evil tyrant.

Lust

Jheronimus Bosch, Tuin der lusten (detail), between 1490 and 1510. Museo del Prado, Madrid

Jheronimus Bosch, Tuin der lusten (detail). Between 1490 and 1510. Museo del Prado, Madrid

Lust is a nearly universal human experience, Dalrymple points out. What is new, he notes, is

the loss of awareness of its status as a cardinal sin and of the disastrous consequences likely to follow when it becomes the principal guide of action.

Some must live in a world

in which, thanks to state support, there is little other guide in this important area of life—or none more important.